KSA revamping education to combat ‘extremist ideologies’

Saudi Arabia is revamping its education curriculum to eradicate any trace of Muslim Brotherhood influence. (AFP)
Updated 21 March 2018

KSA revamping education to combat ‘extremist ideologies’

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia is revamping its education curriculum to eradicate any trace of Muslim Brotherhood influence and will dismiss anyone working in the sector who sympathizes with the banned group, the education minister said.
Promoting a more moderate form of Islam is one of the promises made by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.
The Education Ministry is working to “combat extremist ideologies by reviewing school curricula and books to ensure they do not reflect the banned Muslim Brotherhood’s agenda,” Ahmed bin Mohammed Al-Issa said in a statement issued on Tuesday.
It would “ban such books from schools and universities and remove those who sympathize with the group or its ideology from their posts,” he added.
In September, a large Saudi public university announced it would dismiss employees suspected of ties to the Muslim Brotherhood.
Earlier this month, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman told CBS in an interview that Saudi schools have been “invaded” by elements of the Muslim Brotherhood, which has been designated by Saudi Arabia as a terrorist organization along with other militant groups such as Al- Qaeda and Daesh.
The crown prince has already taken some steps to loosen social restrictions, scaling back the role of religious morality police, permitting public concerts and announcing plans to allow women to drive.


First pilgrims leave under Eyab initiative

Updated 18 August 2019

First pilgrims leave under Eyab initiative

  • Al-Amoudi toured the exhibition dedicated to welcome Eyab’s beneficiaries

Saudi Minister of Transport and Chairman of the General Authority of Civil Aviation (GACA), Dr. Nabeel Al-Amoudi, oversaw the departure of the first 

group of pilgrims under the Eyab initiative on Saturday together with GACA President Abdulhadi bin Ahmed Al-Mansouri.

Eyab seeks to improve services provided to pilgrims, with the authority aiming to enrich pilgrims’ experience at the Kingdom’s airports. It is expected to benefit 30,000 pilgrims during this year’s Hajj season.

Al-Amoudi toured the exhibition dedicated to welcome Eyab’s beneficiaries, inspected the services available and received a briefing from the initiative’s officials.

GACA started an experimental implementation of Eyab this year, aimed at pilgrims returning to Indonesia, India and Malaysia through Jeddah’s King Abdul Aziz International Airport and Madinah’s Prince Mohammed bin Abdul Aziz Airport.