Saudi crown prince gets US pledge on Middle East peace

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Photo for Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman meeting with Jared Kushner special adviser to president Trump in Washington, Mar 20, 2018. (SPA)
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Photo for Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman meeting with Jared Kushner special adviser to president Trump in Washington, Mar 20, 2018. (SPA)
Updated 22 March 2018
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Saudi crown prince gets US pledge on Middle East peace

WASHINGTON: The US has reaffirmed its commitment to Middle East peace at a meeting in Washington between Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, US Middle East envoy Jason Greenblatt, and Jared Kushner, adviser and son-in-law of US President Donald Trump.
“Both countries discussed their shared interest to find a sustainable resolution to the conflict and how best to achieve it,” a tweet from the Saudi Embassy said on Wednesday.
The US push for Israeli-Palestinian peace has been led by Kushner, who held a White House conference on the humanitarian crisis in Gaza last week. But the outlook has been complicated by Palestinian anger over Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel and to move the US Embassy there from Tel Aviv.
The US expects the opening of its Jerusalem Embassy to coincide with the 70th anniversary of the birth of the state of Israel on May 14, when Palestinians observe what they call the Nakba, or catastrophe.
Kushner, 37, who is married to Trump’s daughter Ivanka, has a wide-ranging portfolio that includes Middle East negotiations and relations with China. He lost his top White House security clearance in February amid allegations of conflicts of interest given his extensive property interests.
Greenblatt earlier this week accused Mahmoud Abbas, the Palestinian president, of making “highly inappropriate insults against members of the Trump administration.” Abbas had made a scathing attack on Trump’s Middle East policies, calling David Friedman, US ambassador to Israel, “a son of a dog.”
The envoy also said in a statement that “we are committed to the Palestinian people and to the changes that must be implemented for peaceful coexistence.”


Saudi citizen rewarded after new car turned out to be used

Updated 11 min 40 sec ago
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Saudi citizen rewarded after new car turned out to be used

RIYADH: A citizen from Buraidah has been rewarded by the Ministry of Commerce and Investment (MCI) for complaining about a commercial fraud. He exposed an auto agency who sold him a “new car” which turned out to be second-hand with a chequered history.
The MCI granted a reward of SR25,000 to Hamad Faleh Al-Qahtani, who reported the fraud.
He bought a new car from the auto agency and made the full payment, but soon realized he had been given a second-hand car.
Not only was it used but it had also been in a crash and been repaired and repainted, which was contrary to what had been agreed upon and in violation of the Anti-Commercial Fraud Law. The ministry followed up the matter with investigations to find the truth and take legal action.
The matter was referred to the public prosecution and then to the Administrative Court in Buraidah, which issued the final verdict that the agency was guilty of violating the Anti-Commercial Fraud Law.
The agency was fined SR100,000 ($26,687). Article 11 of the Anti-Commercial Fraud Law states that anyone reporting a case of commercial fraud which is found to be true upon investigation shall be granted 25 percent of the value of the fine.
The MCI honors 100 informers by granting them financial rewards and gifts on World Consumer Rights Day, which is observed on March 15 every year to foster global awareness about consumer rights and needs. The day was inspired by US president John F. Kennedy, the first world leader to formally address the issue of consumer rights.
The consumer movement first marked that date in 1983 and uses it every year to mobilize action on important issues.
The MCI has urged consumers to report commercial frauds through the Consumer Call Center (1900), through the application of a commercial violation report and through the ministry’s website.