Saudi law criminalizes spying on spouse’s mobile phone   

Saudi law has criminalized the act of spying on your spouse’s mobile phone illegally and has listed this act under cybercrimes. (AP)
Updated 31 March 2018
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Saudi law criminalizes spying on spouse’s mobile phone   

LONDON: Saudi law has criminalized the act of spying on your spouse’s mobile phone illegally and has listed this act under cybercrimes. 
Husbands or wives who are caught spying on their spouse’s mobile phone in order to prove dishonest behavior can be imprisoned for up to a year, receive a SR 500,000 fine or receive both forms of punishment. 
According to legal sources, the penalty is imposed on people who access their spouse’s mobile phone without their permission. Accessing your spouse’s mobile phone becomes illegal when you crack their mobile phone’s password, according to the law. 
A penalty of one year in prison and a fine of SR 500,000 is applicable to partners who electronically send the information that they have gained access to. If the person only looks through the phone and does not forward or photograph any of the information, the penalty awarded is less.
Abdul Aziz bin Batel, a lawyer and legal adviser, said that any crime committed using computers, mobile phones and cameras is considered a cybercrime and will be punished accordingly. 


First Saudi female air traffic controllers begin work

Updated 22 March 2019
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First Saudi female air traffic controllers begin work

  • Eleven women completed a one-year program conducted by Saudi Air Navigation Services

JEDDAH: Saudi Air Navigation Services (SANS) on Wednesday celebrated the appointment and start of work of the first batch of Saudi female air traffic controllers at an air traffic control center in Jeddah.
Eleven women completed a one-year program conducted by SANS in cooperation with the Saudi Academy of Civil Aviation. This is the first program to qualify women to work as air traffic controllers.
The academy initiative, in collaboration with SANS, seeks to create more jobs for women as part of a reform push to wean the economy off oil. Vision 2030 plan aims to increase employment and diversify revenue sources.
Earlier, SANS CEO Ryyan Tarabzoni said the state-owned company was prioritizing the hiring of women in the profession, as the country pushes to extend women’s rights in the country and also recruit more nationals as part of the “Saudization” project.