Egypt’s parliament approves establishing anti-terrorism council 

Egypt’s parliament has approved the articles of a new law to establish the Supreme Council for Combating Terrorism. (Reuters)
Updated 03 April 2018
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Egypt’s parliament approves establishing anti-terrorism council 

  • New Supreme Council for combatting Terrorism to be voted in by parliament in Egypt
  • The council will set the strategy to coordinate all state efforts to eradicate terrorism
Egypt’s parliament has approved the articles of a new law to establish the Supreme Council for Combating Terrorism.
The preliminary approval of all 20 articles of the new law modifies a presidential decree which first regulated the council, Egyptian newspapers said.
It will replace the National Council to combat terrorism and extremism suggested by President Abdel Fatah El-Sisi in 2017. The council will set a strategy to mass all state institutions to eradicate both external and internal terrorism without messing with freedom rights.
Parliament speaker Ali Abdel-Aal ‎announced that the final vote on the law ‎will be postponed until a later meeting.
“As ‎we lack two-thirds of MPs as required by ‎the constitution, I decide to postpone the ‎final vote to a later date,” said Abdel-Aal as quoted by Ahram Online. 
The council’s main location will be in Cairo, and its head will have to call for meeting every two months.


Sudan appoints new peace envoy to S.Sudan

Updated 7 min 7 sec ago
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Sudan appoints new peace envoy to S.Sudan

  • Jamal Al-Sheikh was put in charge of “following the implementation” of the peace deal signed last month by warring South Sudanese parties
  • Civil war in the world’s youngest country erupted in December 2013, killing tens of thousands and displacing millions

KHARTOUM: Sudan’s President Omar Al-Bashir on Wednesday appointed a peace envoy to South Sudan, mired in conflict since it won independence from its northern neighbor in 2011.
Former ambassador to Juba, Jamal Al-Sheikh, was put in charge of “following the implementation” of the peace deal signed last month by warring South Sudanese parties, Bashir told a gathering of Sudanese diplomats.
“Peace in Sudan cannot be separated from peace in the region, and achieving peace in South Sudan is a big step toward a comprehensive peace,” he said.
Civil war in the world’s youngest country erupted in December 2013, killing tens of thousands, displacing millions and triggering a regional refugee crisis.
South Sudanese arch-foes President Salva Kiir and rebel chief Riek Machar signed their latest peace deal on September 12 in Ethiopia after talks hosted by Khartoum.
South Sudan gained independence under a peace deal ending a 22-year civil war pitting rebel groups against Khartoum.
But the Darfur region and the states of Blue Nile and South Kordofan, close to oil-rich South Sudan, have continued to see deadly conflict pitting rebel groups against the Sudanese government.
Khartoum accuses Juba of supporting insurgents against it.
A US-funded survey released recently estimated that nearly 400,000 people have been killed in the conflict in South Sudan.