South Korean singer BoA: Six songs that inspired me

South Korean singer BoA (Kwon Bo-ah) is one of dozens of K-pop stars set to perform in Dubai. (Photo supplied)
Updated 04 April 2018
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South Korean singer BoA: Six songs that inspired me

South Korean singer BoA (Kwon Bo-ah) is one of dozens of K-pop stars performing as part of the SM Town World Tour in Dubai on Friday. Here, BoA talks us through six pop tracks she loves.

Michael Jackson
‘Billie Jean’
I started dreaming of becoming a singer after seeing Michael Jackson in the “Billie Jean” video. The mix of fantastic choreography and amazing music made such a huge impact on the music industry. I believe this song inspired a lot of artists, all around the world, to dream of being a singer.

Janet Jackson
‘Rhythm Nation’
She’s truly such a fascinating female artist — the way she dominates the stage. And her shows are so well put together, with the design and the dancers. What I loved most about “Rhythm Nation” were the uniforms and the perfect group choreography.

Madonna
‘4 Minutes’
I’m sure Madonna has been a huge influence for many female artists. Her live shows always make a massive impact; the sets are amazing, and she’s always trying new things on stage. This song impressed me with its power and addictive beat. She’s collaborated with many amazing artists — it’s something I dream of: to have a fantastic collaboration with someone like her.

Britney Spears
‘…Baby One More Time’
I was preparing my debut when this track came out, and it was such a refreshing hit. Her energetic performance and amazing stage presence taught me a lot about what it takes to be a successful singer.

Justin Bieber
‘Boyfriend’
He was so young when he started out, but he made music, like “Boyfriend,” with his own unique color and style, which is amazing. His songs are always on-trend, but show off his personality and thoughts. I always look forward to Justin Bieber’s new music.

Bruno Mars
‘Finesse’
When the trend was to make futuristic music, this throwback to the ‘80s’ and ‘90s’ new-jack-swing style sounded very fresh to me. Personally, this style of music was what I used to listen to so much, and I was so happy to hear it again.


King Abdul Aziz Foundation archives around 6,000 interviews with Saudis

Researching and recording oral histories can give a sense of cultural value. (Photo/Social media)
Updated 22 October 2018
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King Abdul Aziz Foundation archives around 6,000 interviews with Saudis

  • Darah assigned a number of specialized teams to carry out visits to the Kingdom’s different regions

RIYADH: The Oral History Center of the King Abdul Aziz Foundation for Research and Archives (Darah) has archived around 6,000 interviews with Saudi nationals past and present, said the Saudi Press Agency.
The Saudi Oral History Center was established in 1997. It was the third of its kind in the world, after the United States and Britain.
Darah hosts millions of books, recordings, photographs, maps and manuscripts and is considered the main source of Saudi national history inside the Kingdom, and abroad through the Oral History Center.
Darah assigned a number of specialized teams to carry out visits to the Kingdom’s different regions, speak to citizens about their histories, study sources of national history, and document the accounts of those who directly or indirectly contributed to the Kingdom’s history.
It conducted audio-visual interviews with many contemporaries and witnesses, and transcribed them, and investigated those stories based on scientific and technical protocols. It did this in cooperation with universities and international centers specializing in oral history, and with national and regional institutions interested in oral history and heritage.
Darah sees oral history — a precise account from eyewitnesses, or reported contemporary accounts — as an important resource. Many Western countries place great emphasis on oral histories and have established specialized centers to record and preserve such accounts.
The Foundation also considers oral histories a useful tool that can fill gaps left in recorded history, especially regarding personal histories of families.
Researching and recording oral histories can also provide the elderly with a sense of value and bring generations closer together.