MBC group set ‘to collaborate with Hollywood’

Updated 05 April 2018
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MBC group set ‘to collaborate with Hollywood’

  • MBC is set to collaborate with major Hollywood players
  • Jaber dismissed social media as being dubbed a news platform
MBC, the Dubai-based media group, is set to grow internationally and collaborate with major Hollywood players, a senior executive said on Wednesday.
The company’s Group TV Director Ali Jaber said during a panel discussion on the second day of the Arab Media Forum that the company’s chairman was “enthused” about the media company’s future plans following a meeting with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.
“After (MBC Chairman) Sheikh Waleed Ibrahim met with the crown prince, he is enthused about MBC and its future growth into an international organization,” Jaber said.
“It will be responsible for important partnerships between Saudi Arabia and international organizations and Hollywood,” he added.
Joining Jaber on the panel was Lebanese singer Najwa Karam who spoke of the role social media played with celebrities. “It’s more personal and we work on it ourselves but with the experts — we have a direct line of communication with the fans,” she said.
Jaber, however, dismissed social media as being dubbed a news platform but rather called it a “communication platform.”
 
“When you give millions of people a line of communication, you shut down the gatekeeper, making it open for all the people,” he said.
Karam spoke of the importance of knowing the backgrounds of influencers as well as dealing with negative comments that appear on her social media posts, saying that everyone is entitled to their opinion.
“Its important to know the backgrounds of these influencers: Who are they? What did they work before?” Karam said, adding that, “morality counts.”
Jaber also explained that television is not responsible for society’s health, saying that “if we do a show about reading and viewers don’t read … then it’s not television.”
“Schools, families and governmental institutions must play this role,” he added. When asked about cyber-bullying, the group TV director said that every format has its ills, with cyber-bullying being just “cyber” with the bullying always having existed.
The Lebanese singer hit out at Google’s video-sharing website YouTube, asking the company to look out for the rights of the composers, lyricists and artists when allowing a video to be uploaded.

 

Decoder

MBC Group

The organization is the largest private media company in the Middle East & North Africa region.


Facebook asked to protect users in simmering Sri Lanka

Updated 17 November 2018
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Facebook asked to protect users in simmering Sri Lanka

  • Sri Lanka has been in crisis since last month with two men claiming to be prime minister
  • The United National Party wrote to Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg asking the US firm not to cooperate with Rajapaksa’s administration

COLOMBO: Sri Lanka’s largest political party Saturday asked Facebook to protect the identity of its supporters, fearing a crackdown by what it called the “illegal” government.
The Indian Ocean nation has been in crisis since last month with two men claiming to be prime minister, MPs brawling in parliament and the administration paralyzed.
It began on October 26 when President Maithripala Sirisena sacked Ranil Wickremesinghe as premier and replaced him with former strongman Mahinda Rajapaksa.
In chaotic scenes in parliament this week, Rajapaksa lost two votes of no confidence but he is refusing to go and Sirisena has yet to acknowledge the motions.
On Saturday Wickremesinghe’s United National Party (UNP) wrote to Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg asking the US firm not to cooperate with Rajapaksa’s administration.
“We urge Facebook to refrain from disclosing information about... users of the platform to any officials of the illegal government unless it is properly sanctioned by a court of law,” the UNP said.
The UNP had also complained that its official page was blocked by Facebook on Thursday ahead of a mass rally it organized to express solidarity with Wickremesinghe, who insists he is still prime minister.
Sirisena ordered a ban on Facebook across Sri Lanka in March after blaming it for spreading hate speech and fueling intercommunal violence that led to the deaths of three people and destruction of property.
Since then, Facebook had said it was deploying more staff to identify and remove inflammatory material from Sri Lankan users.
This week Sri Lankans had to rely on social media to watch their lawmakers fighting and throwing chilli powder after the main telecommunications company stopped its live broadcast.