Egypt’s Dar Al-Iftaa declares ‘Blue Whale’ video game prohibited in Islam

Egypt’s top Islamic authority said the ‘Blue Whale’ video game consists of ‘several elements’ that are deemed to be ‘forbidden’ in Islam. (Reuters)
Updated 07 April 2018
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Egypt’s Dar Al-Iftaa declares ‘Blue Whale’ video game prohibited in Islam

  • The governmental body has warned against the game after an 18-year-old Egyptian boy reportedly committed suicide after playing the game last week.
  • Dar Al-Iftaa explained how the game demands its players to commit self-harm tasks in a challenge that eventually leads them to take their own lives.
Cairo: Egypt’s Dar al Iftaa, the country’s top Islamic authority, has declared ‘Blue Whale’ forbidden in Islam after learning that the video game has led to several suicide-linked deaths.
The governmental body has warned against the game after an 18-year-old Egyptian boy reportedly committed suicide after playing the game last week.
In a YouTube video, a Dar Al-Iftaa representative said the game consists of “several elements” deemed to be “forbidden” in Islam, as quoted by Al-Masry el-Youm newspaper.
He goes on to explain how the game demands its players to commit self-harm tasks in a challenge that eventually leads them to take their own lives.
“After studies and research into the game, we say that it is a filthy game and causes harm. So we deem that it is forbidden. It is forbidden to play it and we ask our youth to spend their time in something that is productive for them and their society,” he added.
The death of a son of a former Egyptian MP sent shock waves across the community after his family blamed its occurrence on the controversial “game.”
The victim’s siblings said their brother hung himself in his room surrounded by scribblings and symbols referring to the “Blue Whale” video game.


Moody’s sees risk of Lebanon debt rescheduling despite budget

Updated 3 min 46 sec ago
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Moody’s sees risk of Lebanon debt rescheduling despite budget

  • The draft budget aims to cut the deficit to 7.6 percent of gross domestic product from 11.5 percent last year
  • Lebanon has long depended on financial transfers from its diaspora to meet the economy’s financing needs
BEIRUT: Slowing capital inflows to Lebanon and weaker deposit growth increase the risk of a government response that will include a debt rescheduling or another liability management exercise that may constitute a default, Moody’s Investors Service said.
This was despite fiscal consolidation measures included in the draft 2019 budget that is being debated in parliament, Moody’s said in a June 25 credit analysis.
Asked about the report, Finance Minister Ali Hassan Khalil said on Thursday “matters are under control.”
The draft budget aims to cut the deficit to 7.6 percent of gross domestic product from 11.5 percent last year, with Lebanese leaders warning the country faces financial crisis without reform.
Lebanon’s public debt is 150 percent of GDP, among the largest in the world. State finances are strained by a bloated public sector, high debt-servicing costs and subsidies for power.
The Moody’s report said: “Despite the inclusion of fiscal consolidation measures in the draft 2019 budget, slowing capital inflows and weaker deposit growth increase the risk that the government’s response will include a debt rescheduling or another liability management exercise that may constitute a default under our definition.”
Lebanon has long depended on financial transfers from its diaspora to meet the economy’s financing needs, chiefly the state budget deficit and the current account deficit of an economy that imports heavily and exports little by comparison.