My image of Saudi women was so wrong, says Italian journalist

Updated 12 April 2018
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My image of Saudi women was so wrong, says Italian journalist

  • Allegra Salvadori says her preconceived ideas about Saudi were changed as she watched the views from the car
  • Gender inequality is real says Salvadori, in pay, in jobs - but it's a global issue

KING ABDULLAH ECONOMIC CITY, Saudi Arabia: When Allegra Salvadori stepped off a plane at 6 a.m. on Tuesday morning from Dubai to Jeddah, she had no clue her entire perception of Saudi women would be changed at the Arab Women Forum.
 
The Italian journalist and Italian Senate candidate told Arab News she could have slept for an hour on the way to King Abdullah Economic City (KAEC) in Rabigh, but said she experienced the jitters at the prospect of coming to Saudi Arabia for the first time.
 
“I had been given the wrong image of Arab women, which had been portrayed by the media – it was the wrong concept and a misrepresentation, especially in Saudi Arabia,” she explained.
 
“Instead, it’s very nice to come in person to witness that things are different. I’m only here for a day but it’s a very rich day because I’ve had an opportunity to talk to clever women that stand out, who’ve created opportunities for themselves and know exactly what they want and know that there’s a vision to what they want to achieve.”
 
Salvadori admits the gap, whether in gender equality or salary equality, is a global issue, and it exists in Italy as well, whether in poor political representation and women’s roles. It is only being discussed more in Saudi Arabia because it is a country that is undergoing major changes, making it more evident.
 
There is not one right way to solve it either, Salvadori said. “The problem is the same worldwide, but countries approach it differently.”
 
As an experienced woman in the field of journalism, having written for the Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera and Huffington Post, she advises Saudi women who are boarding the male-dominated media train to remain truthful.
 
“Things are always changing, so never follow what’s already been said. Witness the change. Be the change. Sometimes, there are restrictions, dangers, and things that can’t be told or written, and it’s the same all over the world, but always follow your instinct.
 
“As journalists, we are informing people and if we tell it in the wrong way then we’re creating a vicious circle and affecting culture.”
 

  • Allegra Salvadori spoke at the Arab Women Forum on Tuesday about Political Representation; she is a senate candidate of the Italian Republic in Africa, Asia and Australia, and represents over 270,000 of her people in these continents.


 


Nestle, AT&T pull YouTube ads over pedophile concerns

Updated 22 February 2019
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Nestle, AT&T pull YouTube ads over pedophile concerns

  • A video from a popular YouTuber and a report from Wired showed that pedophiles have made unseemly comments on innocuous videos of kids
  • YouTube has faced advertiser boycotts in the past, including a widespread boycott in early 2017

SAN FRANCISCO, US: Several companies, including AT&T and Nestle, are pulling advertisements from YouTube over concerns about inappropriate comments on videos of children.
A video from a popular YouTuber and a report from Wired showed that pedophiles have made unseemly comments on innocuous videos of kids. The comments reportedly included timestamps that showed where kids innocently bared body parts.
YouTube says it disabled comments on tens of millions of videos and deleted offending accounts and channels.
Nestle and Fortnite maker Epic Games say they paused ads on YouTube while the company works on the issue. AT&T says it has removed ads until YouTube can “protect our brand from offensive content of any kind.”
YouTube has faced advertiser boycotts in the past, including a widespread boycott in early 2017. Since then YouTube has made efforts to be more transparent about how it deals with offensive comments and videos on its site.
But the latest flap shows how much of an ongoing problem offensive content continues to be, said eMarketer video analyst Paul Verna.
“When you think about the scope of that platform and what they’re up against, it is really like a game of whack-a-mole to try to prevent these problems from happening,” he said.
Still, because of the powerful advertising reach of YouTube’s parent Google, brands are unlikely to stay away from YouTube for long, he said.
Digital ad spending in the US is expected to grow 19 percent in 2019 to $129.34 billion this year, or 54 percent of estimated total US ad spending, according to eMarketer, with Google and Facebook accounting for nearly 60 percent of that total.
“At the end of the day, there’s a duopoly out there of Google and Facebook,” for digital advertising, he said. “Any brand that doesn’t play the game with either is potentially leaving a big marketing opportunity on the table.”