Nearly half of people living in Saudi Arabia do not save anything, survey finds

Updated 13 April 2018
0

Nearly half of people living in Saudi Arabia do not save anything, survey finds

  • Nearly half of all people living in Saudi Arabia have no savings
  • Just 17% of people in the Kingdom have saved less than 5% of their income

JEDDAH: Some 45 per cent of people living in Saudi Arabia do not save any money at all out of their monthly income, according to a new survey of attitudes towards saving and investment among residents in the Kingdom.

The survey, conducted by the Jeddah based wealth management firm SEDCO Holdings and Dubai-based online finance group Souqamal.com, found that most respondents blamed a low level of income for their failure to put money aside.

It also found that only a further 17 percent saved less than 5 percent, while 38 percent saved more than 6 percent.

The results come as the Ministry of Housing is asking Saudis to save for a deposit on their future home. It finds a lack of a savings culture that makes this goal difficult.

Amr Banaja, a SEDCO executive, said: “Anyone should be able to achieve what they aspire for financial without resorting to borrowing or depriving themselves of what they desire. One can do this by properly managing their finances, shunning needless expense, and choosing appropriate saving and investment opportunities.”

When asked about the reason behind their failure to respond, 60 percent said their level of income prevented it. Since 2014, official statistics show that the average levels of income have risen by 13 percent in the private sector, and 6 percent in government employment, the survey compilers said.

The survey raises the question of whether the cost of living in the Kingdom has risen faster than salaries. According to official figures inflation rose by 7.6 percent between 2014 and 2016. It fell to near zero last year, but jumped again at the beginning of this year, with the introduction of value added tax.

The last official figures showed consumer prices rose 2.7 percent in February, marginally down from the 3 percent of January.

The survey also found that 83 percent of respondents have no long term investment plans, showing a lack of awareness of investment techniques and practices.

Ambareen Musa, founder and CEO of Souqamal, said: “Saving and investment should go hand in hand. Start with a monthly budget and figure out what your basic necessities are that you can save every month.”

SEDCO has launched the Riyali financial literacy program to make people aware of the basics of investment.

The survey was conducted among 2,000 respondents, which included Saudi citizens and expatriates, in line with the Kingdom’s demographics.


US intelligence says Huawei funded by Chinese state security: report

Updated 58 min 26 sec ago
0

US intelligence says Huawei funded by Chinese state security: report

  • The accusation comes at a time of trade tensions between Washington and Beijing
  • Huawei dismissed the allegations

US intelligence has accused Huawei Technologies of being funded by Chinese state security, The Times said on Saturday, adding to the list of allegations faced by the Chinese technology company in the West.
The CIA accused Huawei of receiving funding from China’s National Security Commission, the People’s Liberation Army and a third branch of the Chinese state intelligence network, the British newspaper reported, citing a source.
Earlier this year, US intelligence shared its claims with other members of the Five Eyes intelligence-sharing group, which includes Britain, Australia, Canada and New Zealand, according to the report.
Huawei dismissed the allegations in a statement cited by the newspaper.
“Huawei does not comment on unsubstantiated allegations backed up by zero evidence from anonymous sources,” a Huawei representative told The Times.
The company, the CIA and Chinese state security agencies did not respond immediately to requests for comment.
The accusation comes at a time of trade tensions between Washington and Beijing and amid concerns in the United States that Huawei’s equipment could be used for espionage. The company has said the concerns are unfounded.
Authorities in the United States are probing Huawei for alleged sanctions violations.
Meng Wanzhou, Huawei’s chief financial officer and daughter of its founder, Ren Zhengfei, was arrested in Canada in December at the request of the United States on charges of bank and wire fraud in violation of US sanctions against Iran.
She denies wrongdoing and her father has previously said the arrest was “politically motivated.”
Amid such charges, top educational institutions in the West have recently severed ties with Huawei to avoid losing federal funding.
Another Chinese technology company, ZTE Corp. , has also been at the center of similar controversies in the United States.
US sanctions forced ZTE to stop most business between April and July last year after Commerce Department officials said it broke a pact and was caught illegally shipping US-origin goods to Iran and North Korea. The sanctions were lifted after ZTE paid $1.4 billion in penalties.
Reuters reported earlier this week that the United States will push its allies at a meeting in Prague next month to adopt shared security and policy measures that will make it more difficult for Huawei to dominate 5G telecommunications networks.