University of Sydney academics sign pledge to boycott Israeli universities

Academics at the University of Sydney signed a pledged to boycott Israeli universities following the recent killings of Palestinian protesters in Gaza. (Shutterstock)
Updated 13 April 2018
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University of Sydney academics sign pledge to boycott Israeli universities

  • Signed by at least 37 university professors and research fellows, the petition vows to break all official contact with Israeli universities until Israel complies with international law

Academics at the University of Sydney signed a pledged to boycott Israeli universities following the recent killings of Palestinian protesters in Gaza, The Australian reported on Thursday.

Signed by at least 37 university professors and research fellows, the petition vows to break all official contact with Israeli universities until Israel complies with international law and the principles of human rights, as well as recognise Palestinians’ right to return to the homes from which they were expelled from during the 1948 war.

The move follows the principles of the Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions movement which works to end international support for “Israel’s oppression of Palestinians and pressure Israel to comply with international law.”

A senior lecturer at the University of Sydney and a member of its BDS group, said the lack of international condemnation following this month’s killing of at least 30 unarmed Palestinian protesters and the wounding of hundreds of others had made the campaign necessary.

The protests call on Israel to accept the “right of return” of Palestinian refugees and their descendants.


Fresh protests in Iraq as medics raise death toll to 11

Updated 22 July 2018
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Fresh protests in Iraq as medics raise death toll to 11

  • Security forces remained deployed around the capital Baghdad
  • Overall medical sources put the death toll in the unrest at 11 people

BAGHDAD: Fresh protests hit southern Iraq Sunday as medical sources put at 11 the number of demonstrators killed in two weeks of unrest sparked by ire over corruption and lack of public services.
Security forces remained deployed around the capital Baghdad after struggling Friday to disperse crowds of angry protesters who took to the streets.
Demonstrations have roiled swathes of southern and central Iraq since erupting in the oil-rich port city of Basra on July 8, when security forces opened fire killing one person.
Overall medical sources put the death toll in the unrest at 11 people, three in each of the cities Basra, Samawah and Najaf, and one in both the cities of Diwaniyah and Karbala.
Most of them were killed by gunfire from unidentified assailants, while one person suffocated to death on tear gas used to disperse the demonstrators.
Protesters on Sunday took to the streets in the cities of Samawah and Nasiriyah, chanting “no to corruption,” a scourge Iraqis say has long blighted their country.
Since the start of the demonstrations those involved have focused their anger on the political establishment, with government buildings and party offices being sacked or set ablaze.
The Iraqi authorities have scrambled to halt the unrest and have blocked social media sites online to try to prevent the spread of protests.
Iraq is in a state of political limbo with Prime Minister Haider Al-Abadi overseeing a caretaker government as wrangling to form a new government drags on after elections in May.
A coalition headed by populist cleric Moqtada Sadr topped the polls, campaigning on an anti-graft ticket to claim the most seats in parliament.