CNBC to broadcast business show from new Abu Dhabi HQ

Middle East anchor Hadley Gamble said the Abu Dhabi studio will help ‘tell the global business story through a unique Middle East lens.’ (CNBC)
Updated 16 April 2018
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CNBC to broadcast business show from new Abu Dhabi HQ

  • CNBC will unveil its new Middle East headquarters and TV studios
  • CNBC will broadcast “Capital Connection,” fronted by Middle East anchor Hadley Gamble

London: The financial news network CNBC will on Monday unveil its new Middle East headquarters and TV studios, based at the Abu Dhabi Global Market (ADGM) complex.
The facility will act as the network’s regional hub, and broadcast “Capital Connection,” fronted by Middle East anchor Hadley Gamble.
CNBC’s Nancy Hungerford will co-anchor the show from the network’s Asia headquarters, which is based within the Singapore Exchange, the network said in a statement.
“We’ve been reporting the Middle East business story to CNBC’s elite global audience for years. The launch of our new home within ADGM starts a new chapter in our reporting from the region,” said Gamble.
“These new state-of-the-art studios provide us with a fantastic platform to tell the global business story through a unique Middle East lens.”
CNBC says this week’s broadcasts from the Middle East will include exclusive interviews with Mohamed Khalifa Al-Mubarak, chairman of Aldar Properties, and Saudi Prince Turki Al-Faisal.
Capital Connection broadcasts live from Abu Dhabi between 8 a.m. and 9 a.m. GST, Monday to Thursday.
Guests on Monday include: Peter Baumgartner, CEO of Etihad Airways; Luka Mucic, CFO of SAP and Egyptian billionaire Naguib Sawiris.
John Casey, CNBC’s senior vice president of international news and programming, said: “CNBC broadcasts daily from the network’s International Headquarters in New York, London and Singapore. With the addition of our new Middle East Headquarters at ADGM, we plan to connect Abu Dhabi to the world’s financial capitals.”


What We Are Reading Today: Debating War and Peace by Jonathan Mermin

Updated 15 October 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: Debating War and Peace by Jonathan Mermin

  • Mermin shows that if there is no debate over US policy in Washington, there is no debate in the news
  • The author constructs a new framework for thinking about press-government relations

The First Amendment ideal of an independent press allows American journalists to present critical perspectives on government policies and actions; but are the media independent of government in practice? Here Jonathan Mermin demonstrates that when it comes to military intervention, journalists over the past two decades have let the government itself set the terms and boundaries of foreign policy debate in the news.

Analyzing newspaper and television reporting of US intervention in Grenada and Panama, the bombing of Libya, the Gulf War, and US actions in Somalia and Haiti, he shows that if there is no debate over US policy in Washington, there is no debate in the news. 

Journalists often criticize the execution of US policy, but fail to offer critical analysis of the policy itself if actors inside the government have not challenged it. Mermin ultimately offers concrete evidence of outside-Washington perspectives that could have been reported in specific cases, and explains how the press could increase its independence of Washington in reporting foreign policy news. 

The author constructs a new framework for thinking about press-government relations, based on the observation that bipartisan support for US intervention is often best interpreted as a political phenomenon, not as evidence of the wisdom of US policy. Journalists should remember that domestic political factors often influence foreign policy debate. The media, Mermin argues, should not see a Washington consensus as justification for downplaying critical perspectives.