Yemen PM says no more ‘bloodshed’ in Aden

Yemeni Prime Minister Ahmed bin Daghr attends a celebration marking the 26th anniversary of Yemen's reunification in the southern port city of Aden on September 28, 2016. (AFP)
Updated 16 April 2018
0

Yemen PM says no more ‘bloodshed’ in Aden

  • After spending two months in Riyadh,  Daghr and a number of ministers returned to Yemen last week to run the country from the temporary capital.
  • Earlier this year fierce battles erupted between separatists and forces loyal to the government, killing dozens.

Yemen’s Prime Minister Ahmed Obeid bin Daghr said on Sunday his return to Aden was to bring an end to the instability in the de facto capital, Asharq Al-Awsat reported on Sunday.

“There will be no more bloodshed or fighting because the government is back in Aden. We will exert all our efforts to stop the security situation from further deteriorating and to stop further assassination attempts on dozens of religious and military figures,” the PM said.

After spending two months in Riyadh,  Daghr and a number of ministers returned to Yemen last week to run the country from the temporary capital.

Speaking at a gathering organized by the education ministry, the prime minister promised Yemenis that his government would work on restoring basic services to all areas in the city.

Earlier this year fierce battles erupted between separatists and forces loyal to the government, killing dozens.

Clashes escalated when fighters loyal to the Southern Transitional Council fought their way to the gates of the presidential palace in central Aden, forcing troops to abandon their positions.

Tensions settled after a Saudi and UAE delegation was sent to Aden to restore peace in the city.


Sudan appoints new peace envoy to S.Sudan

Updated 17 October 2018
0

Sudan appoints new peace envoy to S.Sudan

  • Jamal Al-Sheikh was put in charge of “following the implementation” of the peace deal signed last month by warring South Sudanese parties
  • Civil war in the world’s youngest country erupted in December 2013, killing tens of thousands and displacing millions

KHARTOUM: Sudan’s President Omar Al-Bashir on Wednesday appointed a peace envoy to South Sudan, mired in conflict since it won independence from its northern neighbor in 2011.
Former ambassador to Juba, Jamal Al-Sheikh, was put in charge of “following the implementation” of the peace deal signed last month by warring South Sudanese parties, Bashir told a gathering of Sudanese diplomats.
“Peace in Sudan cannot be separated from peace in the region, and achieving peace in South Sudan is a big step toward a comprehensive peace,” he said.
Civil war in the world’s youngest country erupted in December 2013, killing tens of thousands, displacing millions and triggering a regional refugee crisis.
South Sudanese arch-foes President Salva Kiir and rebel chief Riek Machar signed their latest peace deal on September 12 in Ethiopia after talks hosted by Khartoum.
South Sudan gained independence under a peace deal ending a 22-year civil war pitting rebel groups against Khartoum.
But the Darfur region and the states of Blue Nile and South Kordofan, close to oil-rich South Sudan, have continued to see deadly conflict pitting rebel groups against the Sudanese government.
Khartoum accuses Juba of supporting insurgents against it.
A US-funded survey released recently estimated that nearly 400,000 people have been killed in the conflict in South Sudan.