Houthis launch missile after Saudi-led coalition warns of ‘painful’ response; attack thwarted

Col. Turki Al-Maliki, spokesman of the Saudi-led Coalition fighting Houthi rebels in Yemen, presents pictures of unmanned Iranian aircraft being used by the rebels to attack Saudi Arabia. (AN Photo: Essa Al-Doubisi, Bashear Saleh)
Updated 17 April 2018
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Houthis launch missile after Saudi-led coalition warns of ‘painful’ response; attack thwarted

  • Coalition says Houthis have launched 119 ballistic missiles targeted at Saudi Arabia
  • Latest missile attack shot down over Najran

JEDDAH: Saudi air defenses shot down a ballistic missile fired by Houthis toward Saudi Arabia on Monday night, the Saudi-led coalition battling Yemen’s Houthi rebels said on Tuesday.
Colonel Turki Al-Maliki, the coalition's spokesman, said the missile was monitored by the Saudi Air Force to have been launched from Yemen's Amran province at 10:16 p.m. Monday toward populated areas in the southern Saudi province of Najran.
The missile was intercepted before it could hit its target, Al-Maliki said.
The incident happened hours after the coalition warned of a “painful” response if the Houthis mounted new attacks on Saudi Arabia using what it said were Iran-supplied drones.
Saudi forces said they have shot down two drones in the south of the kingdom and intercepted ballistic missiles fired from rebel-held parts of Yemen, the latest in a series of similar incidents.
“If the Houthis continue targeting industrial or residential facilities, the response will be hard and painful,” said Al-Maliki, displaying remnants of the intercepted aircraft.
He said the Houthis have launched 119 ballistic missiles targeted at Saudi Arabia.
Al-Malki told reporters in the eastern city of Alkhobar that the airport of Yemen's rebel-held capital, Sanaa, was used as a military base to orchestrate the drone strike.
The Yemeni government of President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi last week said the drones were “made in Iran,” adding that Yemen’s military did not possess such aircraft and it was “impossible to manufacture them locally.”
Iran backs the Houthis, who seized Sanaa in 2014, prompting a Saudi-led military coalition to intervene against the rebels the following year.
Tehran has repeatedly denied arming the rebels, which would violate a United Nations weapons embargo slapped on Yemen in 2015.
Nearly 10,000 people have since been killed in Yemen’s conflict, in what the United Nations has called the world’s worst humanitarian crisis. 

(With AFP)


KSRelief to provide 5,000 Yemenis with school supplies

Saudi Arabia is ranked the first donor in the world when it comes to humanitarian financial and logistical support in Yemen. AFP
Updated 9 sec ago
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KSRelief to provide 5,000 Yemenis with school supplies

  • There are two million Yemeni children out of school because of the Houthis’ aggression against civilians
  • The total cost of all the projects provided by KSRelief since its establishment is $70 million

JEDDAH: King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief) has launched a project to provide Yemeni students and schools with supplies to ensure that education continues across the country despite the brutal acts of militants. The trucks started to carrying the aid from Riyadh to Yemen on Monday.

“It is a project to provide Yemen’s schools with the essential needs to ensure a better and smoother educational environment, such as chairs, desks, and boards, in addition to students’ supplies. It will support nearly 5,000 students across Yemen,” said Dr. Samer Aljetaily, spokesman for KSRelief.
“The trucks will arrive first in Ma’arib, then it will be distributed to the most needed areas across the country’s schools and students.”
“My Education” is one of the big projects given to support Yemen’s people in health, shelter, infrastructure, environment and education to help the country stand on its feet regardless of any devastation caused by the militants.
“The total cost of all the projects provided by KSRelief since its establishment is $70 million. In terms of education, the center has given financial aid to schools, paid teachers’ salaries, and provided students’ essential school needs and meals. We will continue supporting our brothers and sisters in Yemen in all sectors.”
This project has been supported by the Saudi Ministry of Education and the Saudi-led Islamic Military Coalition. “The coalition always supports our all initiatives in the interest of Yemeni citizens. The coalition will protect the aid till it arrives in Ma’arib, then it will support logistically to facilitate the distribution of the supplies. Education is a priority for the Saudi government and for KSRelief.
“We have always supported education in Yemen and always will, whether it is for schools, educational institutions, students, teachers, or even educational curricular and psychological support departments to help students become better amid all the horrific acts caused by the Houthis. KSRelief is very keen on building a strong future with a well-educated generation of Yemenis.”
Asked whether there is a lack of international support for Yemen, he told Arab News: “Saudi Arabia, along with the UAE, has attracted global attention to Yemen’s humanitarian status in different ways, including direct funding for the infrastructure of the country and huge support for health, education and the environment. Saudi Arabia is ranked the first donor in the world when it comes to humanitarian, financial and logistical support in Yemen. This has encouraged other countries’ support as well.
“The UAE has greatly supported the Yemen humanitarian file with $1 billion. The international community has reacted to this.
“However, there must be more international collaboration to reduce the militants’ attacks on the aid and supplies and facilitate the entry of aid and ensure a higher level of safety. There is also need for better cooperation to protect students and children in the militants’ controlled areas,” he emphasized.
“The Saudi Ministry of Education has supported this initiative by providing school supplies and students’ essential supplies.”
There are two million Yemeni children out of school because of the Houthis’ aggression against civilians.