UK's Laura Plummer appears on camera for first time since arrest in Egypt

Updated 17 April 2018
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UK's Laura Plummer appears on camera for first time since arrest in Egypt

  • Laura Plummer has been jailed for three years after she was founding carrying 290 Tramadol painkillers, which are banned in Egypt
  • Her family say they have complained to the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office

CAIRO: Briton, Laura Plummer, who was jailed in Egypt for possessing banned painkillers, has appeared before the cameras for the first time since her arrest.

Footage from local television channel Sada Al-Balad showed Plummer sitting at the front row of a makeshift church in Al Qanater prison, Cairo's women jail, during an Easter mass. 

The minute-long video showed her dressed in a white long-sleeved prison uniform. 

This is the first time the 33-year-old had been seen since her arrest in October at the Hurghada airport, Egypt's coastal Red Sea city. 

She is serving a three-year sentence for carrying 290 illegal Tramadol painkillers in her suitcase.  The drug is illegal in Egypt but not in the UK.  

Plummer’s sister Jayne Synclair, 40, told The Sun: "It's so hard to see her like this."

"She doesn't bear any resemblance to her. My mum is in bits and has complained to the Foreign Office,” Synclair added.

The UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office is reportedly aware of the footage.


Rivers dry and fields dust, Iranian farmers turn to protest

Updated 50 min 13 sec ago
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Rivers dry and fields dust, Iranian farmers turn to protest

  • Protests have repeatedly broken out over economic woes in Iran
  • Every day, farmers hold a small protest outside Varzaneh, gathered around their tractors, long idle

VARZANEH, Iran: Farmers in central Iran are increasingly turning to protests, pleading to authorities for a solution as years of drought and government mismanagement of water destroy their livelihoods.
Protests have repeatedly broken out over economic woes in Iran, which has been enduring its worth drought in decades. Experts say the drought’s impact has been worsened as newly built factories soak up what little water there is.
Every day, farmers hold a small protest outside Varzaneh, gathered around their tractors, long idle, parked at the town entrance next to a canal that once irrigated their fields but has been dry for years.
The rallies have gotten larger, with bursts of violence, at a time when economic woes in the country from inflation to unemployment have fueled unrest repeatedly over the last year.