Black Panther the ideal choice for Saudi cinema debut, says film critic

Jeddah-based film blogger Maher Mosly
Updated 19 April 2018
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Black Panther the ideal choice for Saudi cinema debut, says film critic

  • No other movie suits the occasion as much as Black Panther does, says Mosly
  • Blogger predicts Saudi film industry to take off

JEDDAH: Few people are more ready for the opening of Saudi’s first cinema in more than 35 years than Maher Mosly, a Jeddah-based film blogger with a YouTube channel dedicated to his reviews in Arabic.

Mosly began reviewing films in 2014, watching films on iTunes about three months after release and traveling to Dubai every few months to watch batches of the big new releases. He saw Black Panther in Dubai, and believes it is an ideal choice for the new cinema’s first screening.

“No other movie suits the occasion as much as Black Panther does. It is a great choice because until now, we do not know the criterion that will be applied in cinemas here. Of course there will be regulations on what is safe to show, whether it is political or too different from Saudi culture.

“Black Panther is a safe choice: it is suitable for ages 13 and above, families can enjoy it, it has no controversial themes and is completely a fantasy genre.” 

He predicted that cinemas will be popular due to their novelty. “Tickets will sell, consumption will be high.” 

The new cinemas will also boost the film industry in the Kingdom. “Our movies are revealed at global festivals, but they are short films, and we never get a chance to see them. With the cinemas finally opening in the Kingdom, we will go into the industry. There will be professional institutes for theater, voice-acting etc,” Mosly said. 

“It won’t be something you do to pass the time any more,” he added. “It will be a profession from the start. We will have producers.”

Saudi film fans will no longer have to travel to neighbouring Gulf countries for screenings. “In Bahrain or Dubai, most who attend the cinemas are Saudis,” Mosly pointed out.  

“I believe that in a year, our cinemas will be more like the ones all over the Gulf countries. Dubai is doing a great job. It’s not accepting all movies, but not rejecting all movies either. Big movies are entering their cinemas, but with the necessary restrictions of course,” he said.

“Cinemas are never not a part of entertainment around the world. The easiest entertainment plan I can think of is to take my wife and kids out for dinner and later go to the movies. Cinemas are essential to entertainment.”


Preachers of Hate: Arab News launches series to expose hate-mongers from all religions

Updated 14 min 28 sec ago
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Preachers of Hate: Arab News launches series to expose hate-mongers from all religions

  • Daesh may be defeated, but the bigoted ideas that fueled their extremism live on
  • Campaign could not be more timely, with a rise in anti-Muslim hate crimes since Christchurch attacks

RIYADH: Dozens of Daesh militants emerged from tunnels to surrender to Kurdish-led forces in eastern Syria on Sunday, a day after their “caliphate” was declared defeated.

Men filed out of the battered Daesh encampment in the riverside village of Baghouz near the Iraqi border to board pickup trucks. “They are fighters who came out of tunnels and surrendered today,” Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) spokesman Jiaker Amed said. “Some others could still be hiding inside.”

World leaders hail Saturday’s capture of the last shred of land controlled by Daesh in Syria, but the top foreign affairs official for the semi-autonomous Kurdish region warned that Daesh captives still posed a threat.

“There are thousands of fighters, children and women and from 54 countries, not including Iraqis and Syrians, who are a serious burden and danger for us and for the international community,” Abdel Karim Omar said. “Numbers increased massively during the last 20 days of the Baghouz operation.”

 While the terrorists have a suffered a defeat, the pernicious ideologies that drive them, and the hate speech that fuels those ideologies, live on. For that reason Arab News today launches Preachers of Hate — a weekly series, published in print and online, in which we profile, contextualize and analyze extremist preachers from all religions, backgrounds and nationalities.

In the coming weeks, our subjects will include the Saudi cleric Safar Al-Hawali, the Egyptian preacher Yusuf Al-Qaradawi, the American-Israeli rabbi Meir Kahane, the Yemeni militia leader Abdul Malik Al-Houthi, and the US pastor Terry Jones, among others.

The series begins today with an investigation into the background of Brenton Tarrant, the Australian white supremacist who shot dead 50 people in a terrorist attack 10 days ago on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand.

Tarrant is not just a terrorist, but is himself a Preacher of Hate, author of a ranting manifesto that attempts to justify his behavior. How did a shy, quiet boy from rural New South Wales turn into a hate-filled gunman intent on killing Muslims? The answers may surprise you.

Our series could not be more timely — anti-Muslim hate crimes in the UK have soared by almost 600 percent since the Christchurch attack, it was revealed on Sunday.

The charity Tell MAMA (Measuring Anti-Muslim Attacks), which records and measures anti-Muslim incidents, said almost all of the increase comprised “language, symbols or actions linked to the Christchurch attacks.”

“Cases included people making gestures of pointing a pistol at Muslim women and comments about British Muslims and an association with actions taken by the terrorist in New Zealand,” the charity said.

“The spike shows a troubling rise after Muslims were murdered in New Zealand,” said Iman Atta, director of Tell MAMA. “Figures have risen over 590 percent since New Zealand in comparison to the week just before the attack.