ADNOC’s new trading unit to play ‘critical role’ in expansion plans

ADNOC logos on display at GASTECH, in Chiba, Japan. ADNOC has set up a new unit for trading crude oil and refined products as part of its strategy to maximize returns on every barrel of oil produced and drive revenue from new business streams. (Reuters)
Updated 23 April 2018
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ADNOC’s new trading unit to play ‘critical role’ in expansion plans

  • ADNOC CEO Sultan Ahmed Al Jaber: “As ADNOC grows and expands its upstream and downstream businesses, we will produce more products, and in turn, our marketing, sales and trading function will play an even more critical role.”
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“Engaging in non-speculative trading will allow us to maximize value from our domestic and, over time, international downstream operations.”

LONDON: Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC) has set up a new unit for trading crude oil and refined products as part of its strategy to maximize returns on every barrel of oil produced and drive revenue from new business streams.

“As ADNOC grows and expands its upstream and downstream businesses, we will produce more products, and in turn, our marketing, sales and trading function will play an even more critical role,” said Sultan Ahmed Al Jaber, UAE minister of state and ADNOC Group CEO.



“Engaging in non-speculative trading will allow us to maximize value from our domestic and, over time, international downstream operations,” added Al Jaber.

The news comes as ADNOC is pushing forward with its plans to expand its downstream business in anticipation of the growth in the global petrochemicals sector.

“Looking out over the next two decades, we anticipate the sharpest growth within the energy sector will be petrochemicals, with demand forecast to climb 150 percent by 2040,” Al Jaber said.

“To capitalize on this opportunity and make ADNOC more resilient against possible price volatility, our goal is to become a major global downstream player, creating a strong pull for our products, combined with the flexibility to respond quickly to shifting market needs,” he said in an official statement.

ADNOC announced last November it was planning to invest more than 400 billion dirhams ($109 billion) over the next five years to increase its domestic refining, gas and petrochemicals businesses as well as expand its international downstream operations.

The firm is expected to set out its plans for downstream growth at an investment forum being held in Abu Dhabi in May.

ADNOC’s 2030 strategy — approved in 2016 — aims to increase petrochemical production from 4.5 million tons per year in 2016 to 11.4 mtpa by 2025.


India suspends Kashmir border trade with Pakistan

Updated 19 April 2019
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India suspends Kashmir border trade with Pakistan

  • Kashmir has been on edge since a February suicide attack that killed 40 Indian paramilitaries
  • India said it had reports that trade on the border was being “misused by Pakistan-based elements for funnelling illegal weapons, narcotics and fake currency”

NEW DELHI: India has suspended trade across its disputed Kashmir border with Pakistan, alleging that weapons and drugs are being smuggled across the route, as tensions simmer between the nuclear-armed neighbors.
Kashmir has been on edge since a February suicide attack that killed 40 Indian paramilitaries and brought the two countries to the brink of war with cross-border air strikes.
On Thursday, India’s government, which is in the middle of a tough national election, said it had reports that trade on the border was being “misused by Pakistan-based elements for funnelling illegal weapons, narcotics and fake currency.”
It also said many of those trading across the Line of Control, which divides Kashmir into zones under Indian and Pakistani control, had links to militant organizations.
The home ministry said trade would be suspended until a stricter inspection mechanism is in place.
The cross-border trade is based on a barter system, with traders exchanging goods including chillies, cumin, mango and dried fruit.
It began in 2008 as a way to improve strained relations between New Delhi and Islamabad, who have fought two of their three wars over the disputed region.
The Indian Express newspaper said Friday that 35 trucks carrying fruit traveling from the Indian side of the border had been stopped after the government order.
Trade on the border has been suspended before, including in 2015, when India accused a Pakistani driver of drug trafficking.
The latest move comes after India withdrew “Most Favoured Nation Status” — covering trade links — from Pakistan after the February attack, which was claimed by the Pakistan-based Jaish-e-Mohammed Islamist group.
Islamabad has denied any involvement in the attack.
India’s Hindu nationalist Prime Minister Narendra Modi has made national security a key plank of his re-election campaign, pointing to the recent flare-up of violence as he battles the center-left opposition Congress party.
He is seeking a second term from the country’s 900 million voters in the mammoth election which kicked off on April 11 and runs till May 19. The results will be out on May 23.