Russia says ‘no alternative’ to Iran nuclear deal

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a plenary session of BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) Summit, in Xiamen, China September 4, 2017. (Reuters)
Updated 25 April 2018
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Russia says ‘no alternative’ to Iran nuclear deal

MOSCOW: Russia said on Wednesday that there was "no alternative" to the current Iran nuclear deal, after US President Donald Trump and French counterpart Emmanuel Macron called for a new agreement with Tehran.
"We believe that no alternative exists so far," President Vladimir Putin's spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters, adding that Iran's position on the subject was paramount.
"We are in favour of keeping the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action in its current form," Peskov added, referring to the nuclear deal hammered out in 2015.
He said the agreement was the product of the efforts of many countries.
"The question is, will it be possible to repeat such successful work in the current situation," Peskov added.
Iran's President Hassan Rouhani rejected the US and French calls, and the EU also insisted the current agreement must stay.
Trump faces a May 12 deadline to decide on the fate of the Iran nuclear accord and is demanding changes that European capitals believe would represent a legal breach.


Nobel laureate Murad to build hospital in her hometown in Iraq

Updated 15 December 2018
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Nobel laureate Murad to build hospital in her hometown in Iraq

  • The laureate was awarded the $1 million prize alongside Congolese doctor Denis Mukwege
  • She said she will use the money to “build a hospital in Sinjar to treat ill people, mainly widows and women”

SINJAR, Iraq: Nadia Murad, an Iraqi Yazidi woman held as a sex slave by Daesh militants who won this year’s Nobel Peace Prize, said on Friday she intended to use the prize money to build a hospital for victims of sexual abuse in her hometown.
The Yazidi survivor was speaking to a crowd of hundreds in Sinjar, her hometown in northern Iraq.
“With the money I got from the Nobel Peace prize, I will build a hospital in Sinjar to treat ill people, mainly widows and women who were exposed to sexual abuses by Daesh militants,” she told the crowd and gathered journalists.
She thanked the Iraqi and Kurdistan governments for agreeing to her plan and said she would be contacting humanitarian organizations “soon” to start construction.
Murad was awarded the $1 million prize alongside Congolese doctor Denis Mukwege for their efforts to end the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and armed conflict.
She was one of about 7,000 women and girls captured in northwest Iraq in August 2014 and held by Daesh in Mosul, where she was tortured and raped.
She escaped after three months and reached Germany, from where she campaigned extensively to appeal for support for the Yazidi community.
The Yazidi area in Sinjar had previously been home to about 400,000 people, mostly Yazidis and Arab Sunnis.
In a matter of days, more than 3,000 Yazidis were killed and about 6,800 kidnapped, either sold into slavery or conscripted to fight for Daesh as the religious minority came under attack.