Duo on trial in Riyadh over ‘Qaddafi, Saddam’ imitation voice message

Two suspects on trial at the Specialized Criminal Court in Riyadh for terror-related charges. (SPA)
Updated 25 April 2018
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Duo on trial in Riyadh over ‘Qaddafi, Saddam’ imitation voice message

JEDDAH: Two suspects facing 12 terror-related charges are on trial in a Riyadh-based court, Okaz newspaper reported.
The suspects are on trial for recording a voice message where they imitated the voices of toppled Libyan leader Muammar Al-Qaddafi and former Iraqi president Saddam Hussein in an effort to criticize the local Abha Tourism Festival.
The first suspect is facing eight charges, including supporting terror groups Al-Nusra Front and Daesh.
The suspect is accused of preparing, sending and storing items deemed harmful to public order and morals. He was also communicating with a member of Daesh in Syria, the newspaper added.
He appears to follow social media accounts affiliated with Daesh, in addition to disseminating information and publications by the terror group via Twitter and Telegram and WhatsApp to his friends, including the second suspect, whom he had shared Daesh-related videos with.
The second suspect is facing four charges, including meeting the first suspect, inciting him to support terror groups, and harboring him from security forces.
He is also accused of disturbing public order by taking part in a voice message that criticized the Abha festival, by sending it via WhatsApp to a number of friends.


Mosque of Bones: Evidence of Prophet Muhammad’s era

Updated 25 May 2018
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Mosque of Bones: Evidence of Prophet Muhammad’s era

JEDDAH: Masjid Al-Izam (Mosque of the Bones) is a historic mosque in Al-Ula governorate, located 300 km north of Madinah.
In the ninth year after Hijrah (the emigration of Makkah’s Muslims to Madinah), as the Prophet Muhammad was on his way to battle, he marked the Qibla (the direction in which Muslims should pray) using bones because he could not find rocks or blocks.
To mark the occasion, the area’s residents built a mosque on that spot and named it Masjid Al-Izam.
It was made of stone, and mud was used to cover its walls, but it has undergone several restorations.
“Mention of the mosque can be found in many renowned scientific sources,” Abdullah Kaber, a researcher in Madinah’s development authority, told the Saudi Press Agency (SPA).
He said Masjid Al-Izam has attracted the attention of King Salman, who is focused on restoring a number of historic mosques across the Kingdom.
The Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) is planning to develop tourism in Al-Ula since it houses many historical sites and relics.