The top six Arab female entrepreneurs

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The Palestinian co-founder of Fetchr tops the list for securing the highest external funding — $52 million — for her pick up, delivery and logistics services start-up based in Dubai. (Facebook)
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After four rounds of funding, UAE-based e-commerce site Mumzworld's Palestinian co-founders Ataya (pictured) and Khalil had attracted heavyweight investors. (Facebook)
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Another Palestinian entrepreneur, Haddad managed to raise $4.5 million for her social media app development business. (Facebook)
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The Jordanian entrepreneur managed to generate $4.3 million for her Dubai-based online marketplace for home services. (Supplied)
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Taimeh and Shanak (pictured) are the co-founders of the Jordan-based e-commerce platform ShopGo. (Facebook)
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As co-founder of Lebanon-based alternative-energy startup Energy24, Nadia Moussouni helped raise $3 million in funding. (Facebook)
Updated 28 April 2018
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The top six Arab female entrepreneurs

Arab women are shaking up the Middle East business world. Here are the Middle Eastern female entrepreneurs whose startups were ranked the most successful of 2017 by Forbes Middle East.
Fetchr: Joy Ajlouny
The Palestinian co-founder of Fetchr tops the list for securing the highest external funding — $52 million — for her pick up, delivery and logistics services start-up based in Dubai. “I’ve always been a risk-taker,” Ajlouny told Forbes. “I don’t believe you ‘become’ an entrepreneur. It’s something that’s born. It’s either in you or it’s not.”
Mumzworld: Mona Ataya & Leena Khalil
After four rounds of funding, UAE-based e-commerce site Mumzworld — dedicated to mother-and-baby items — Palestinian co-founders Ataya (pictured) and Khalil had attracted heavyweight investors including Wamda Capital, twofour54, and Endeavor Catalyst. The most important factor in their success, Ataya told Arabnet, is “our first-hand experience as parents.”
AppMahal: Mona Haddad
Another Palestinian entrepreneur, Haddad managed to raise $4.5 million for her social media app development business. “The best place for women to break the glass ceiling is in business, mainly because success in business is measured, and nobody can argue about it,” Haddad told Entrepreneur Middle East.
ServiceMarket: Bana Shomali
The Jordanian entrepreneur managed to generate $4.3 million for her Dubai-based online marketplace for home services, which evolved out of MoveSouq.com, co-founded by Shomali and Wim Torfs in 2013. “There is this high to starting on your own,” Shomali told Arabia Inc. “It’s addictive. The thrill of it sucks you in.”
ShopGo: Lubna Taimeh & Noora Shanak
Taimeh and Shanak (pictured) are the co-founders of the Jordan-based e-commerce platform ShopGo, which raised $3.4 million in funding, with venture capital firm Silicon Badia contributing heavily. The company is geared toward helping businesses in the MENA region set up an online store quickly and efficiently.
Energy24: Nadia Moussouni
As co-founder of Lebanon-based alternative-energy startup Energy24, Nadia Moussouni helped raise $3 million in funding. Investors were attracted by technology that can store and manage electrical power at a 60-percent saving on conventional generators and has been hailed as a possible solution to power cuts in Lebanon.


House of Khan: Pakistani finds fame as ‘Game of Thrones’ doppelganger

Updated 22 March 2019
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House of Khan: Pakistani finds fame as ‘Game of Thrones’ doppelganger

  • The 25-year-old so resembles actor Peter Dinklage, who plays Tyrion Lannister in TV hit ‘Game of Thrones’
  • Not only are Khan and Dinklage’s faces strikingly similar, they are also the same height

RAWALPINDI, Pakistan: Pakistani waiter Rozi Khan had never heard of the Game of Thrones — or its hugely popular character Tyrion Lannister — until his striking resemblance to the dwarf anti-hero got heads turning at home.
The 25-year-old so resembles actor Peter Dinklage — who has played the witty and wily nobleman since the hit series’ first season in 2010 — that he gets regularly stopped by strangers desperate for a picture.
“I don’t mind. A lot of my pictures have been taken, that’s why I have become very famous everywhere,” he said.
Not only are Khan and Dinklage’s faces strikingly similar, they are also the same height at around 135 cms (4 ft 5in).
Photographs of the pair have unsurprisingly made their way onto social media showing the doppelgangers side-by-side.
“Wherever I go, someone says to me: ‘Sir, who is this man with you on Facebook’, I say that he is my friend. ‘He looks like you’. I tell them he is my brother. It’s not a bad thing,” said Khan.

Khan and Dinklage. (AFP)


The television series has won 47 Emmys — more than any other fictional show in history — along with a Golden Globe for Dinklage, 49, for best supporting actor in 2012.
A much anticipated final series is set to premiere on April 17.
Khan works at a small Kashmiri restaurant down a narrow line in Rawalpindi, serving customers hearty dishes such as mutton and spinach curries.
Owner Malik Aslam Pervez described him as a hard-worker — and also a drawcard for the eatery.
“When he takes a day off or gets sick, people look for him and ask where did he go? They get upset. They love him. There is always a crowd here but it has boomed because of him,” he said.
Born in Mansehra in northern Pakistan, Khan says he would love to meet Dinklage, describing him as a friend and brother.
“I love him very much, he is my friend... he is my height so I like him a lot,” said Khan.
For customers, seeing Tyrion Lannister in the flesh is also a thrill.
“When I saw him, I’m happy, I feel that I met with Lannister in real [life],” said Zain Hadri, 20.
“Game of Thrones” tells the story of noble families vying for control of the Iron Throne, all the while keeping one eye on the “White Walkers” leading hordes of the undead toward an invasion from the North.