The top six Arab female entrepreneurs

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The Palestinian co-founder of Fetchr tops the list for securing the highest external funding — $52 million — for her pick up, delivery and logistics services start-up based in Dubai. (Facebook)
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After four rounds of funding, UAE-based e-commerce site Mumzworld's Palestinian co-founders Ataya (pictured) and Khalil had attracted heavyweight investors. (Facebook)
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Another Palestinian entrepreneur, Haddad managed to raise $4.5 million for her social media app development business. (Facebook)
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The Jordanian entrepreneur managed to generate $4.3 million for her Dubai-based online marketplace for home services. (Supplied)
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Taimeh and Shanak (pictured) are the co-founders of the Jordan-based e-commerce platform ShopGo. (Facebook)
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As co-founder of Lebanon-based alternative-energy startup Energy24, Nadia Moussouni helped raise $3 million in funding. (Facebook)
Updated 28 April 2018
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The top six Arab female entrepreneurs

Arab women are shaking up the Middle East business world. Here are the Middle Eastern female entrepreneurs whose startups were ranked the most successful of 2017 by Forbes Middle East.
Fetchr: Joy Ajlouny
The Palestinian co-founder of Fetchr tops the list for securing the highest external funding — $52 million — for her pick up, delivery and logistics services start-up based in Dubai. “I’ve always been a risk-taker,” Ajlouny told Forbes. “I don’t believe you ‘become’ an entrepreneur. It’s something that’s born. It’s either in you or it’s not.”
Mumzworld: Mona Ataya & Leena Khalil
After four rounds of funding, UAE-based e-commerce site Mumzworld — dedicated to mother-and-baby items — Palestinian co-founders Ataya (pictured) and Khalil had attracted heavyweight investors including Wamda Capital, twofour54, and Endeavor Catalyst. The most important factor in their success, Ataya told Arabnet, is “our first-hand experience as parents.”
AppMahal: Mona Haddad
Another Palestinian entrepreneur, Haddad managed to raise $4.5 million for her social media app development business. “The best place for women to break the glass ceiling is in business, mainly because success in business is measured, and nobody can argue about it,” Haddad told Entrepreneur Middle East.
ServiceMarket: Bana Shomali
The Jordanian entrepreneur managed to generate $4.3 million for her Dubai-based online marketplace for home services, which evolved out of MoveSouq.com, co-founded by Shomali and Wim Torfs in 2013. “There is this high to starting on your own,” Shomali told Arabia Inc. “It’s addictive. The thrill of it sucks you in.”
ShopGo: Lubna Taimeh & Noora Shanak
Taimeh and Shanak (pictured) are the co-founders of the Jordan-based e-commerce platform ShopGo, which raised $3.4 million in funding, with venture capital firm Silicon Badia contributing heavily. The company is geared toward helping businesses in the MENA region set up an online store quickly and efficiently.
Energy24: Nadia Moussouni
As co-founder of Lebanon-based alternative-energy startup Energy24, Nadia Moussouni helped raise $3 million in funding. Investors were attracted by technology that can store and manage electrical power at a 60-percent saving on conventional generators and has been hailed as a possible solution to power cuts in Lebanon.


Weinstein reaches deal to settle civil proceedings for $44 million: report

Updated 24 May 2019
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Weinstein reaches deal to settle civil proceedings for $44 million: report

  • The deal, which has not yet been signed, aims to cover all civil proceedings filed against the fallen Hollywood mogul
  • The settlement does not exempt Weinstein from the criminal proceedings brought against him for sexual assault

NEW YORK: Disgraced Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein has reached a provisional $44 million settlement with alleged victims and creditors, the Wall Street Journal reported on Thursday.
The deal, which has not yet been signed, aims to cover all civil proceedings filed against the fallen Hollywood mogul, including those in Canada and the United Kingdom.
Weinstein’s spokesperson denied to comment.
The settlement does not exempt Weinstein from the criminal proceedings brought against him for sexual assault, for which he will go on trial in September.
Weinstein — a catalyst for the #MeToo anti-harassment movement — has been charged over the alleged assaults of two women and faces life in prison if he is convicted at the trial, which could last five weeks.
In addition to the alleged victims and creditors, the settlement covers the proceedings started by former New York state attorney general Eric Schneiderman, who has been succeeded by Letitia James.
The proceedings aim specifically to guarantee the alleged victims will be compensated.
James’s spokesperson also declined to comment.
The settlement amount will be paid out by insurance agencies, the Journal reported, several of which count The Weinstein Company, the production company Weinstein co-founded, among their clients.
Since October 2017, Weinstein — one of the most powerful men in Hollywood before a cascade of sexual misconduct allegations precipitated his downfall — has been accused of sexual harassment and assault by more than 80 women.
Among his accusers are prominent actresses such as Ashley Judd, Angelina Jolie and Salma Hayek.