Kingdom’s Council for Economic Development to spend $35bn on Saudi lifestyles by 2020

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The Council of Economic and Development Affairs (CEDA) has launched the Quality of Life Program 2020, one of the Vision Realization Programs 2030 approved by the Council of Ministers. (AN Photo: Bashear Saleh)
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The Council of Economic and Development Affairs (CEDA) has launched the Quality of Life Program 2020, one of the Vision Realization Programs 2030 approved by the Council of Ministers. (AN Photo: Bashear Saleh)
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The Council of Economic and Development Affairs (CEDA) has launched the Quality of Life Program 2020, one of the Vision Realization Programs 2030 approved by the Council of Ministers. (AN Photo: Bashear Saleh)
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The Council of Economic and Development Affairs (CEDA) has launched the Quality of Life Program 2020, one of the Vision Realization Programs 2030 approved by the Council of Ministers. (AN Photo: Bashear Saleh)
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The Council of Economic and Development Affairs (CEDA) has launched the Quality of Life Program 2020, one of the Vision Realization Programs 2030 approved by the Council of Ministers. (AN Photo: Bashear Saleh)
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The Council of Economic and Development Affairs (CEDA) has launched the Quality of Life Program 2020, one of the Vision Realization Programs 2030 approved by the Council of Ministers. (AN Photo: Bashear Saleh)
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The Council of Economic and Development Affairs (CEDA) has launched the Quality of Life Program 2020, one of the Vision Realization Programs 2030 approved by the Council of Ministers. (AN Photo: Bashear Saleh)
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The Council of Economic and Development Affairs (CEDA) has launched the Quality of Life Program 2020, one of the Vision Realization Programs 2030 approved by the Council of Ministers. (AN Photo: Bashear Saleh)
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The Council of Economic and Development Affairs (CEDA) has launched the Quality of Life Program 2020, one of the Vision Realization Programs 2030 approved by the Council of Ministers. (AN Photo: Bashear Saleh)
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The Council of Economic and Development Affairs (CEDA) has launched the Quality of Life Program 2020, one of the Vision Realization Programs 2030 approved by the Council of Ministers. (AN Photo: Bashear Saleh)
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The Council of Economic and Development Affairs (CEDA) has launched the Quality of Life Program 2020, one of the Vision Realization Programs 2030 approved by the Council of Ministers. (AN Photo: Bashear Saleh)
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The Council of Economic and Development Affairs (CEDA) has launched the Quality of Life Program 2020, one of the Vision Realization Programs 2030 approved by the Council of Ministers. (AN Photo: Bashear Saleh)
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The Council of Economic and Development Affairs (CEDA) has launched the Quality of Life Program 2020, one of the Vision Realization Programs 2030 approved by the Council of Ministers. (AN Photo: Bashear Saleh)
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The Council of Economic and Development Affairs (CEDA) has launched the Quality of Life Program 2020, one of the Vision Realization Programs 2030 approved by the Council of Ministers. (AN Photo: Bashear Saleh)
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The Council of Economic and Development Affairs (CEDA) has launched the Quality of Life Program 2020, one of the Vision Realization Programs 2030 approved by the Council of Ministers. (AN Photo: Bashear Saleh)
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The Council of Economic and Development Affairs (CEDA) has launched the Quality of Life Program 2020, one of the Vision Realization Programs 2030 approved by the Council of Ministers. (AN Photo: Bashear Saleh)
Updated 04 May 2018
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Kingdom’s Council for Economic Development to spend $35bn on Saudi lifestyles by 2020

  • Quality of Life 2020 program aims to improve Saudi Arabians' lifestyle
  • Crown Prince Mohammed is keen to make the Kingdom's economy more diversified and Saudi Arabia's society more vibrant.

JEDDAH: The Council of Economic and Development Affairs (CEDA) has launched the Quality of Life Program 2020, one of the Vision Realization Programs 2030 approved by the Council of Ministers.

The implementation plan for the program reflects the vision of the government of King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to prepare the environment to improve individuals and families’ lifestyle. 

It will also enhance participation in cultural, entertainment, sports and other activities that contribute to the quality of life and to job creation, as well as encourage investment opportunities and diversification of economic activities, while enhancing the status of Saudi cities in the ranking of the best cities in the world.

Total expenditure will be SR130 billion ($34.6 billion), of which SR74.5 billion is total direct investment in the program. 

Government capital expenditure is more than SR50 billion until 2020, and investments available to the private sector are around SR23.7 billion.

This does not include all forms of capital expenditure in major projects such as the Qiddiya project, the Red Sea project, Al-Dariyah Gate project, Historical Jeddah project, and the Royal Commission for Al-Ula, in addition to all related projects of the private sector, with total investments exceeding SR86 billion.

The program aims to achieve non-oil GDP growth in the related sectors 0f 20 percent a year until 2020, and the contribution of local content by 67 percent until 2020. 

The program indicators within macroeconomic measures include creating more than 346,000 jobs and generating non-oil revenues of SR1.9 billion.

The overarching goal is to have at least three Saudi cities included in the list of the top 100 cities in the world to live in by 2030. While the overall aspiration refers to three cities in the Kingdom, the program aims for the improvement of the lifestyle of citizens and residents throughout Saudi Arabia.

Quality of Life 2020 aspires to provide economic and investment opportunities for sustainable growth and development. Creative industries have proved to be key drivers of economic growth around the world.

 A number of funding models will be developed to stimulate the private sector to invest in both capital expenditures and operating expenses.

The program uses educational institutions and sports clubs to promote sports activities in the community by diversifying activities and facilitating access to sports services. This is in addition to upgrading the infrastructure available for sporting activities.

The program aims to provide 492 suitable places for sport as well as increasing the use of sports facilities from 8 percent to 55 percent. It also aims to contribute to the distinction of Saudi sport globally, by preparing a number of elite athletes in the Kingdom and improving their performance to participate effectively in the Olympic Games.

The program promotes the athletic participation of girls at school. It aims to have 325,000 girls taking part in physical education classes, training 7,500 teachers and providing 1,500 schools with gyms.

The program also promotes the Kingdom’s contribution to arts and culture through the elevation and development of cultural and artistic fields (visual arts, performing arts, filmmaking, poetry, design and national heritage) by focusing on refining the talents of artists and amateurs, increasing and improving the quality of domestic production and enhancing the Kingdom’s international presence in the arts and culture. 

The program also aims to establish an island for arts and culture in Jeddah, including 45 cinemas, 16 theaters and 42 libraries, and the Royal Arts Complex in Riyadh by 2020 to promote the arts and culture sector in Kingdom.


King Salman, Crown Prince Mohammed ‘lend new dimension to unification’

Millions of citizens plan to celebrate the Saudi national day on Sunday. (SPA)
Updated 23 September 2018
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King Salman, Crown Prince Mohammed ‘lend new dimension to unification’

  • More than 900,000 fireworks will light up the sky from 58 locations across the Kingdom

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s National Day, celebrated every year on Sept. 23, has come a long way in broadening the concept of unification over the years.
Though the National Day meant unifying disparate sheikhdoms under the nation’s founder, the late King Abdul Aziz, its implications across the political, socioeconomic and cultural spectrum have not been lost on successive rulers.
It was King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman who fine-tuned the definition of unification as an operating philosophy. This is why millions of citizens plan to celebrate the Saudi National Day on the streets on Sunday.
The capital city, along with other Saudi cities, will witness fireworks and the unfurling of the largest national flag. More than 900,000 fireworks will light up the sky from 58 locations across the Kingdom.
Car owners, limousine drivers and young Saudi motorcyclists said that they planned to go for drives, particularly on the fashionable streets of the capital city, to celebrate. Grocery shops, stationery shops and vendors were selling bunting, flags, banners and pictures of national heroes.
“We went around the city to see the lighting and fireworks,” said Saleh Al-Omri, a local pharmacist. “Green and white balloons fill either sides of Riyadh streets,” he said.
In his National Day congratulatory message, Sheikh Abdul Aziz bin Abdullah Al-Sheikh, Grand Mufti of Saudi Arabia, said: “The wise policy of the leaders of this country contributed to peace, security and stability.”
Fakhr Al-Shawaf, chief executive of Al-Bawani Contracting Co., said: “We are celebrating the 88th anniversary of our unification, a day when the late King Abdul Aziz established the Saudi nation.”
Ali Al-Othaim, a member of Riyadh Chamber’s board of directors, said: “The Kingdom is on the path of comprehensive economic and social development under Vision 2030.”
Shafik Namdar, a taxi driver, said that he had bought an SR10 flag for his car and planned to work and also drive with his friends to look at the city and its landmark buildings.
Several young boys, including Arslan, 12, and Mishal, 14, said that they had bought bunting, badges and flags to decorate their houses. They planned to celebrate with a special meal at home with relatives, before going into the city streets for dance and music. Some of them had plans to organize celebrations in public parks.