UAE’s Dana Gas agrees with creditors on $700 mln sukuk restructuring

Updated 13 May 2018
0

UAE’s Dana Gas agrees with creditors on $700 mln sukuk restructuring

DUBAI: Energy producer Dana Gas reached agreement with creditors on restructuring $700 million of sukuk, the firm said on Sunday, potentially ending a protracted legal battle that unsettled the global Islamic finance industry.
The United Arab Emirates firm said in June it would not redeem the Islamic bonds, arguing that changes in Islamic financial practice since they were issued made them invalid under UAE law. This led to months of negotiations and a fight in UAE and British courts.
Under the deal with the sukuk holders’ committee, investors who want to exit the instruments will be able to do so at 90.5 cents on the dollar, which includes a bonus of 2.5 cents if they accept within seven days of the start of the tender offer.
Alternatively, investors will be able to exchange the sukuk into new three-year Islamic instruments with a 4 percent profit rate, while receiving final profit payments that they were owed before the old sukuk matured last Oct. 31.
“The consensual transaction represents a means to resolve amicably all current issues and disputes facing the parties,” Dana said in a statement.
The company said it expected to launch the tender offer this month and complete the deal by the first half of July — though this depended on conditions including payment of costs of certain parties, termination of all current litigation, and the release of certain claims being met.
Holders representing over 52 percent of $350 million of sukuk that were convertible into equity, and over 30 percent of $350 million of non-convertible sukuk, agreed to take no further action before the tender offer, Dana said.
Its shares jumped 4.8 percent in early trade on Sunday in response to news of the deal, which it said could cut its debt by up to $385 million.


Iran anti-money laundering law faces challenge as deadline looms

Updated 18 August 2018
0

Iran anti-money laundering law faces challenge as deadline looms

  • Iran has been trying to implement standards set by the Financial Action Task Force
  • Foreign businesses say legislation that includes FATF guidelines is essential if they are to increase investment

DUBAI: A top Iranian constitutional body has demanded changes to anti-money laundering measures passed by parliament, state-run media said on Saturday, as Tehran nears a deadline to pass legislation to help it attract investment while facing USsanctions.
Iran has been trying to implement standards set by the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), an inter-governmental organization which underpins regimes combatting money laundering and terrorist financing. It hopes it will be removed from a blacklist that makes some foreign investors reluctant to deal with it.
In June, FATF said Iran had until October to complete the reforms or face consequences that could further deter investors from the country, which has already been hit by the return of US sanctions. {nL5N1UY39D]
Hard-liners in parliament have opposed legislation aimed at moving toward compliance with FATF standards, arguing it could hamper Iranian financial support for allies such as Lebanon’s Hezbollah, which the United States has classified as a terrorist organization.
The Guardian Council, which vets legislation passed by parliament for compliance with the constitution, objected to four items in the anti-money laundering amendments and returned the measure to parliament, spokesman Abbas Ali Kadkhodaei was quoted by the judiciary’s news agency Mizan as saying.
Kadkhodaei did not give details of the four items, according to Mizan.
Earlier this month, the Guardian Council approved legal amendments on combating the funding of terrorism.
Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said in June parliament should pass legislation to combat money laundering according to its own criteria.
Foreign businesses say legislation that includes FATF guidelines is essential if they are to increase investment.