No fatalities in new Makkah crane accident

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A construction crane crashes to the ground at an expansion site in the Grand Mosque in Makkah on Sunday. (Twitter photo)
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A construction crane crashes to the ground at an expansion site in the Grand Mosque in Makkah on Sunday. (Twitter photo)
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A construction crane crashes to the ground at an expansion site in the Grand Mosque in Makkah on Sunday. (Twitter photo)
Updated 21 May 2018
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No fatalities in new Makkah crane accident

  • On September 11, 2015, a crawler crane toppled over onto a crowded section at the Grand Mosque, killing 111 people and injuring 394.
  • This time, the crane collapsed as an area not dedicated for prayer, and was far from visitors and worshippers.

MAKKAH: Part of a mobile crane being used for construction work at the Grand Mosque in Makkah toppled to the ground on Sunday. 
The driver of the crane was slightly injured in the incident, but no one else was hurt. 
The Makkah Governorate said the area of the Grand Mosque where the crane collapsed was not dedicated for prayer, and was far from visitors and worshippers.
“An arm of a mobile crane has fallen in a work area in the Grand Mosque, and the necessary measures are being taken. The site is dedicated to work not to prayer, and away from the path of visitors and pilgrims. The driver of the crane has been slightly injured,” the governorate said. Spending boost The Presidency of the Two Holy Mosques explained in a statement that “at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, a small, overloaded crane’s arm deviated from its track and collapsed in an isolated work area near Gate 160 at the third Saudi expansion project of the Grand Mosque.”
Saudis on social media dismissed the significance of the incident and called on others to refrain from spreading exaggerated rumors.
“A crane’s arm fell and people are making a big deal out of it! The country is spending billions  on projects for the Grand Mosque and you are spreading news about such a minor incident,” said one Twitter user (@Drtogomori). 
At least 107 people were killed and about 400 injured on Sept. 11, 2015, when a crane toppled over near the Grand Mosque in Makkah amid stormy weather, just days before Hajj.


Saudi Aramco recognized as a leader in the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Updated 22 January 2019
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Saudi Aramco recognized as a leader in the Fourth Industrial Revolution

JEDDAH: Saudi Aramco’s Uthmaniyah Gas Plant (UGP) has been recognized by the World Economic Forum (WEF) as a “Lighthouse” manufacturing facility and a leader in technology applications of the Fourth Industrial Revolution. 
Saudi Aramco is the first energy company globally to be included in this select group of manufacturing sites. The plant is also the only facility in the Middle East to be recognized by WEF. 
The announcement was made ahead of WEFs annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland.
The gas plant is one of the world’s largest gas processing plants and was commissioned in 1981 as part of Saudi Aramco’s Master Gas System to process associated gas from oil wells. 
The use of drones and wearable technologies to inspect pipelines and machinery has helped cut inspection time by 90% in this industrial facility.
“The recognition of the Uthmaniyah Gas Plant demonstrates Saudi Aramco’s shift to transform and adapt in the rapidly changing global energy landscape. Uthmaniyah is only one part of our large integrated energy value chain where IR 4.0 technologies are playing a critical role to enable significant capital and operational efficiencies,” said Amin H. Nasser, Chief Executive Officer of Saudi Aramco.
The seven new facilities join nine other “Manufacturing Lighthouses” which WEF unveiled in September 2018. The 16 factories were selected from an initial list of 1,000 manufacturers based on their successful implementation of cutting-edge technologies of the future that drive financial and operational impact.
The “Lighthouse” program was conducted by WEF in collaboration with McKinsey during a year-long study. A study team visited UGP in Saudi Arabia and performed a thorough audit.