Yemen’s deputy army chief survives assassination attempt

Maj. Gen. Saleh Al-Zindani
Updated 28 May 2018
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Yemen’s deputy army chief survives assassination attempt

  • “This terrorist regime” in Tehran, “which supplies terrorist militias all over the world
  • Iran backs the Houthis, who seized Sanaa in 2014

ADEN: The deputy chief of Yemeni Army, Maj. Gen. Saleh Al-Zindani, survived an attempt on his life in Aden, the Saudi Press Agency reported on Sunday.
The assassination attempt took place when Al-Zindani was leaving a hospital in Aden last night. Yemeni Prime Minister Ahmed Obeid bin Daghr condemned the incident calling it a barbaric act that puts international security and stability in jeopardy.
The incident is under investigation and no group has claimed the responsibility for the incident.
The Houthi militias have wreaked havoc on the country.
Iran backs the Houthis, who seized Sanaa in 2014, prompting an Arab military coalition to intervene against the militias the following year.
Last week, Yemen’s newly appointed Foreign Minister Khalid Al-Yamani categorically said there cannot be peace in the country unless the Houthis abandon their arms.
“The internationally recognized government will not allow Iran, which backs the Houthis, to maintain a foothold in Yemen or interfere in its internal affairs,” he added.
“This terrorist regime” in Tehran, “which supplies terrorist militias all over the world, is close to collapse as a result of international and popular pressure by the Iranian people, who are suffering as their terrorist state spends billions here and there for a foolish expansionist idea,” Al-Yamani said.
“The modern and civilized world that respects international law cannot accept the existence of a state sponsor of terrorism and all subversive and terrorist militias in the region,” he added.

 


Russia ‘skeptical’ over UN Syrian crimes against humanity report

Updated 7 min 41 sec ago
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Russia ‘skeptical’ over UN Syrian crimes against humanity report

MOSCOW: Russia’s foreign minister on Thursday said he was “skeptical” about a UN report accusing the Syrian regime of committing crimes against humanity during the siege of Eastern Ghouta.
The report published Wednesday said forces loyal to the government had deliberately starved civilians during the siege between February and April, among other crimes.
“We are in principle very skeptical toward the methods of this sort of work, whether it comes to war crimes or the use of chemical weapons,” Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said at a press conference in Moscow with UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres.
When questioned by journalists, Lavrov confirmed he had not seen the report.
He said it was “based on data obtained through social networks, video that was filmed by witnesses,” rather than being put together on the ground.
The five-year siege, on the outskirts of the capital, ended in April when Damascus regained control of the rebel enclave.
As pro-government forces dramatically escalated their campaign to recapture the besieged enclave, they used tactics that were “largely unlawful in nature,” the UN-commissioned report said.
The tactics, it said, “aimed at punishing the inhabitants of eastern Ghouta and forcing the population, collectively, to surrender or starve.”
Russia has been involved in Syria’s civil war since September 2015. Its military support of the regime changed the course of the war, allowing government troops to retake more than half the country from rebels and the Daesh group.
More than 350,000 people have been killed in Syria’s war since it started in 2011 with the brutal repression of anti-government protests.