Listed UAE property companies report 30% rise in combined first-quarter profits

Aldar Properties announced a 4 percent rise in its first-quarter profit to 668 million dirhams, from 641 million dirhams, in what the emirate’s largest developer described as a “strong start to the year.” (Courtesy Aldar)
Updated 04 June 2018
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Listed UAE property companies report 30% rise in combined first-quarter profits

DUBAI: The aggregate profits of the UAE’s 13 publicly listed property companies rose by almost 30 percent in the first quarter, state-run news agency WAM reported.
The real estate companies’ profits surged to 4.35 billion dirhams ($1.18 billion), from 3.36 billion dirhams a year ago, during the period ended March, which beat “expectations of industry analysts” and led the “market in terms of dividend distributions, thanks to a consistently growing demand,” the report added.
At the Dubai Financial Market, the eight listed property companies reported profits worth 3.65 billion dirhams during the first three months of the year, 36.2 percent higher compared with the 2.68 billion dirhams in the same period of 2017. The data was consolidated from the financial figures released by the companies.
Emaar Properties, the UAE’s biggest listed property developer, was the best performer with a 1.5-billion-dirham profit for the first quarter as topline numbers were boosted by higher contributions from its shopping malls and hospitality businesses.
The Dubai developer has launched a few projects this year: Dubai Creek Harbour, Downtown Dubai, Dubai Hills Estate, Emaar South, Emaar Beachfront, Arabian Ranches and Dubai Marina.
Emaar Development, the real estate arm of Emaar, earlier said its net profit increased by about 62 percent to 819 million dirhams during the three months to end-March, from 506 million dirhams a year earlier.
Over at the Abu Dhabi Securities Exchange, the combined income of the five listed property companies rose 3.8 percent to 704 million dirhams during the first quarter from 678 million dirhams a year ago.
Aldar Properties announced a 4 percent rise in its first-quarter profit to 668 million dirhams, from 641 million dirhams, in what the emirate’s largest developer described as a “strong start to the year.”
“Development sales for the quarter were 681 million dirhams, driven by sales of existing developments under construction, with over 80 percent of all projects under development sold as at March 31,” Aldar said in a statement.
The developer also launched Reflection at the end of the quarter, a boutique development on Reem Island which consists of 374 units.
Aldar and Emaar entered into a joint venture last March to develop 30 billion dirhams worth of pipeline projects, initially focusing on Emaar Beach Front in Dubai and Saadiyat Grove at Saadiyat Island in Abu Dhabi.


Libya’s National Oil against paying ‘ransom’ to reopen El Sharara field

Updated 14 December 2018
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Libya’s National Oil against paying ‘ransom’ to reopen El Sharara field

  • Ransom payment would set dangerous precedent
  • NOC declared force majeure on exports on Monday

BENGHAZI: Libya’s state-owned National Oil Corp. (NOC) said it was against paying a ransom to an armed group that has halted crude production at the country’s largest oilfield.
“Any attempt to pay a ransom to the armed militia which shut down El Sharara (oilfield) would set a dangerous precedent that would threaten the recovery of the Libyan economy,” NOC Chairman Mustafa Sanalla said in a statement on the company’s website.
NOC on Monday declared force majeure on exports from the 315,000-barrels-per-day oilfield after it was seized at the weekend by a local militia group.
The nearby El-Feel oilfield, which uses the same power supply as El Sharara, was still producing normally, a spokesman for NOC said, without giving an output figure. The field usually pumps around 70,000 bpd.
Since 2013 Libya has faced a wave of blockages of oilfields and export terminals by armed groups and civilians trying to press the country’s weak state into concessions.
Officials have tended to end such action by paying off protesters who demand to be added to the public payroll.
At El Sharara, in southern Libya, a mix of state-paid guards, civilians and tribesmen have occupied the field, camping there since Saturday, protesters and oil workers said. The protesters work in shifts, with some going home at night.
NOC has evacuated some staff by plane, engineers at the oilfield said. A number of sub-stations away from the main field have been vacated and equipment removed.
The occupiers are divided, with members of the Petroleum Facilities Guard (PFG) indicating they would end the blockade in return for a quick cash payment, oil workers say. The PFG has demanded more men be added to the public payroll.
The tribesmen have asked for long-term development funds, which might take time.
Libya is run by two competing, weak governments. Armed groups, tribesmen and normal Libyans tend to vent their anger about high inflation and a lack of infrastructure on the NOC, which they see as a cash cow booking billions of dollars in oil and gas revenues annually.