WATCH: Viral video of historic moment first female driving license is issued in Saudi Arabia

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The video shows the woman, who already has an international driving license, being given her Saudi license by officials, as per regulations allowing her to drive in the Kingdom. (Screenshot - Twitter: @saudalzmanan)
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A Saudi Arabian woman shows her new driver license issued on Monday June 4. (Twitter: @Ahlamalthunayan)
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Photo released by the Saudi Information Ministry, shows Esraa Albuti, as she displays her brand new driving license, at the General Department of Traffic in the capital, Riyadh, Monday, June 4, 2018. (AP)
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Photo released by the Saudi Information Ministry, shows a Saudi Arabian woman buckling her seat belt before doing a driving test, Riyadh, June 4, 2018. (AP)
Updated 20 June 2018
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WATCH: Viral video of historic moment first female driving license is issued in Saudi Arabia

  • A video capturing the first time a driving license has been issued to a female in the Kingdom has gone viral
  • On May 8 it was announced by General Department of Traffic Director-General Mohammed Al-Bassami that Saudi women would be allowed to start driving in the kingdom from June 24

RIYADH: It is a monumental moment in the history of Saudi Arabia, and a video capturing the first time a driving license has been issued to a female in the Kingdom has gone viral.
The video shows the woman, who already has an international driving license, being given her Saudi license by General Directorate of Traffic (GDT) officials, as per regulations allowing her to drive in the Kingdom.
“Thousands of congratulations to the daughters of the homeland, being issued the first license in Saudi Arabia,” the tweet containing the video by @saudalzmanan read.

The GDT has now started replacing women’s Kingdom-approved foreign driving licenses with Saudi ones.

After confirming the validity of foreign licenses submitted via an online portal, and assessing applicants’ ability to drive by conducting a practical test, the first group of women received their Saudi licenses on Monday.
On May 8 it was announced by the General Department of Traffic Director General Mohammed Al-Bassami that Saudi women would be allowed to start driving in the kingdom from June 24.

“All the requirements for women in the kingdom to start driving have been established,” Al-Bassami said in a statement.

Procedures to replace and obtain licenses for everyone are expected to be announced soon.

A Saudi Arabian woman shows her new driver license issued on Monday June 4. (Twitter: @Ahlamalthunayan)

In September 2017, a royal decree announced the end of a decades-long ban on women driving — the only one of its kind in the world.
Five Saudi universities have launched driving schools for women: Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University in Riyadh, King Abdul Aziz University in Jeddah, Tabuk University, Taif University and Imam Muhammad ibn Saud Islamic University.
The Saudi Driving School, at Princess Nourah University, the first for women in the capital, was launched in partnership with the Emirates Driving Institute in Dubai, an established driving school in the region.
Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, 32, is seen as the force behind the lifting of the ban, part of a series of reforms being pushed by the Crown Prince.
His Vision 2030 reform plan for a post-oil era seeks to elevate women to nearly one-third of the workforce, up from about 22 percent now.


Investigation into alleged mistakes in Yemen find coalition forces acted properly

Updated 17 January 2019
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Investigation into alleged mistakes in Yemen find coalition forces acted properly

JEDDAH: The Joint Incident Assessment Team in Yemen (JIAT) has investigated four allegations made by international governmental and non-governmental organizations and media about mistakes made by coalition forces while carrying out military operations inside Yemen.
JIAT spokesman Mansour Al-Mansour said that the team concluded that the procedures followed by the coalition forces were proper and safe, taking into consideration the rules of engagement, international humanitarian law and the coalition’s own rules.
Team members visited a number of cities in Yemen, including Aden, Lahj and Khor Maksar, during the investigation and spoke to witnesses, victims and their families to gather evidence and establish the facts.
In one of the incidents that was investigated, coalition warship fired on and destroyed a craft in the waters off the Yemeni port of Al-Khokha in September. Al-Mansour said that after examining documents and evidence JIAT had concluded that an alliance ship was escorting and protecting a flotilla of three Saudi merchant ships when, in an area off the port of Al-Khokha, a boat was spotted approaching the convoy at a high speed from the direction of the Yemeni coast.
The escort ship followed the accepted rules of engagement by repeatedly warning the unidentified vessel, using loudspeakers, not to come any closer. When these went unheeded, warning shots were fired but the boat continued to approach.
“On reaching an area that represented a threat to the convoy, the protection ship tackled the boat according to the rules of engagement and targeted it, resulting in an explosion on the boat,” said Al-Mansour. “The protection ship continued escorting the convoy. After the escort task was completed, the protection ship returned to the site of the targeted boat to carry out a search-and-rescue operation for the crew of the target boat but no one was found.”