Fixed-rate mortgages to boost Saudi Arabia’s home ownership

Residential properties in Riyadh. The Saudi government aims to boost home ownership among citizens from 50 percent to 60 percent. (Shutterstock)
Updated 13 June 2018
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Fixed-rate mortgages to boost Saudi Arabia’s home ownership

  • SRC plans to roll out new funding to the Kingdom’s lenders, which means buyers will no longer be held hostage to US interest rate movements
  • SRC estimates there are just 160,000 mortgages outstanding in a population of more than 31 million

LONDON: Saudi home buyers will be able to tap long-term, fixed-rate mortgages for the first time as part of a $32 billion push to raise home ownership.
The Saudi Real Estate Refinance Company (SRC) plans to roll out new funding to the Kingdom’s lenders, which in effect means buyers will no longer be held hostage to US interest rate movements.
The Public Investment Fund-backed finance company will soon be able to support long-term, fixed-rate mortgages and also plans to launch its first debt issuance next month, CEO Fabrice Susini told Arab News.
Gulf economies with currencies pegged to the US dollar typically raise and lower interest rates in tandem with the Fed.
Interbank borrowing rates in Saudi Arabia and the UAE for example have been ticking up in line with US interest rates — making loans more expensive to repay.

Saudi Arabia wants to boost its primary home loans market from SR290 billion to SR500 billion by the end of the decade and to as much as SR800 billion in 10 years.

While floating rates can sometimes reward borrowers, they can also punish them when rates begin to rise.
The current cycle of rising US interest rates comes at a time of sluggish growth and property market weakness across the Gulf.
“In the context of Saudi Arabia or any pegged country, the interest rate variation is partly outside the control of the domestic central bank,” said Susini. “So globally, it means that my mortgage can become unaffordable regardless of my personal situation or even my immediate economic environment. Long-term fixed rates mitigate or address most of these risks or drawbacks.”
Mortgaged properties account for a tiny proportion of the overall housing stock in the Kingdom, where in the past house construction has often been self-built and more informally financed.
SRC estimates there are just 160,000 mortgages outstanding in a population of more than 31 million.
Susini said that there were also moves underway to encourage banks to extend mortgage lending beyond civil servants and the employees of select companies.

 

Such lending criteria have in the past put mortgage finance beyond the reach of many people in the Kingdom.
SRC wants to acquire existing loan portfolios from lenders seeking to boost liquidity. It also plans to package loan portfolios into mortgage-backed securities to sell to domestic and international investors.
SRC was set up last year with initial capital of about SR5 billion ($1.33 billion) from the Kingdom’s Public Investment Fund. Helping Saudis to buy their own affordable homes and boosting the contribution of property to overall economic growth is part of Saudi Vision 2030 — a blueprint for economic diversification that aims to wean the Kingdom off its oil dependence.
Saudi Arabia wants to boost its primary home loans market from SR290 billion to SR500 billion by the end of the decade and to as much as SR800 billion within 10 years.
The government also aims to boost home ownership among Saudi citizens from 50 percent to 60 percent.
Like other regional markets, Saudi house prices weakened further last year as the low oil price combined with limited access to financing and a housing supply shortage began to weigh on the sector. Yet despite the housing market weaknesses, analysts are upbeat on the market’s prospects largely because of the existing pent-up housing demand and the intention of the government to invest heavily in boosting home ownership.
“The slowdown in the residential market continued in 2017 as tightening market liquidity weighed on transaction volumes and prices,” said Knight Frank analyst Raya Majdalani in the real estate consultancy’s review of the market published in January.

FASTFACTS

160,000

The Saudi Real Estate Refinance Company estimates there are just 160,000 mortgages outstanding in a population of more than 31 million.


Intel CEO resigns after probe of relationship with employee

Krzanich led Intel as rival chipmakers ate away at its dominance in the technology over several decades and he also presided over a series of high-level executive departures. (AP)
Updated 24 min 41 sec ago
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Intel CEO resigns after probe of relationship with employee

  • Corporations are under increasing pressure to “walk the walk” on executive behavior with the rise of the #MeToo movement
  • The board named Chief Financial Officer Robert Swan as interim CEO

Intel Corp. Chief Executive Brian Krzanich resigned on Thursday after an investigation found he had a consensual relationship with an employee in breach of company policy.
The head of the largest US chipmaker is the latest in a line of men in business and politics to lose their jobs or resign over relationships viewed as inappropriate, a phenomenon highlighted by the #MeToo social media movement.
Krzanich led Intel as rival chipmakers ate away at its dominance in the technology over several decades and he also presided over a series of high-level executive departures.
The change in leadership comes as Intel expands beyond personal computers and servers into areas such as artificial intelligence and self-driving cars, where smaller competitors including Nvidia Corp. are strong. Qualcomm Inc. leads in the mobile chip market.
The board named Chief Financial Officer Robert Swan as interim CEO and said it has begun a search for a permanent CEO, including internal and external candidates.
“An ongoing investigation by internal and external counsel has confirmed a violation of Intel’s non-fraternization policy, which applies to all managers,” Intel said in a statement, declining to give any further information about the probe. Its shares fell 2.4 percent.
The company’s board was informed a week ago that Krzanich had a mutual relationship with an employee in his chain of command in the past, according to a source familiar with the matter who asked not to be named. The relationship began before Krzanich became CEO in 2013 and ended several years ago, the person said.

‘BK’ out
Krzanich, who did not have an employment contract, is entitled to a $38 million “walk-away” payment in the event of a voluntary termination, according to Intel’s regulatory filings.
Of that, $31 million is in the form of accelerated stock awards and $4.1 million in the form of deferred compensation, based on Intel’s share price on Dec. 29.
An Intel spokesman declined to say whether the walk-away payment applied to Krzanich’s resignation, but said the investigation into Krzanich’s conduct continued and that the board reserved the right to take further action.
Corporations are under increasing pressure to “walk the walk” on executive behavior with the rise of the #MeToo movement, said Ivan Feinseth, chief investment officer at Tigress Financial Partners.
In the last few months Martin Sorrell, founder of advertising giant WPP Plc, and casino mogul Steve Wynn of Wynn Resorts Ltd. resigned after accusations of impropriety. Wynn has denied the accusations and Sorrell has denied any wrongdoing.
Krzanich, 58, an engineer and Intel veteran known at the company as “BK,” was appointed CEO in May 2013. Intel shares more than doubled during his tenure as the company expanded into new markets.
He was recently credited with containing the fallout from the discovery of security flaws in the company’s chips that could allow hackers to steal data from computers, although his sale of much of his Intel stock before the flaws were disclosed to investors attracted some criticism.

Time for an outsider?
His temporary replacement, Robert Swan, has been Intel’s CFO since October 2016 and previously spent nine years as CFO of eBay Inc. Given his short tenure and lack of experience in manufacturing, he is not likely to be named permanent CEO, Cowen analyst Matthew Ramsay said.
While Intel dominates in processors for servers and data centers, global competitors are catching up with its manufacturing technology, said Bernstein analyst Stacy Rasgon.
“BK will go down in history as the CEO that let Intel’s process leadership advantage slip away,” he said, adding that a change at the top could bring in fresh ideas.
Kevin Cassidy, an analyst at Stifel, said that Intel would take the change in stride.
“Although we respect Krzanich’s efforts in redirecting Intel’s strategy from a computer-centric to a data-centric company, we view Intel as a process-driven company with a deep bench of CEO candidates that can continue to drive the corporate strategy,” he said.
In its 50-year history, Intel has never appointed a permanent CEO who did not come up through the company’s ranks.
But those ranks are thinner than they used to be, with prominent Intel executives such as former CFO and manufacturing chief Stacy Smith, former president Renee James, ex-architecture chief Dadi Perlmutter and Dianne Bryant, who headed the data center group, leaving in recent years.
Instead, Krzanich’s replacement could end up being one of the outsiders he brought into the company’s executive ranks, a sort of “insider outsider” such as Murthy Renduchintala, Intel’s chief engineering officer who joined Intel in 2015 after helping lead Qualcomm’s chip business.
“They’ve got some very good people they’ve brought in,” said Dan Hutcheson, CEO of VLSI Research Inc, who “know the company, know the new direction. It’s not a turnaround story.”
UBS analyst Tim Arcuri wrote to clients that “the door is open to hire from the outside.”
Intel on Thursday raised its second-quarter revenue and profit forecast, saying it expects quarterly revenue of about $16.9 billion and adjusted profit of about 99 cents per share, up from a previous forecast of $16.3 billion in revenue and adjusted earnings per share of 85 cents.
Analysts on average were expecting revenue of $16.29 billion and adjusted profit of 85 cents per share.
“There are no new payments as part of his departure,” a source familiar with the company told Reuters.