Saudi Arabia confiscates 4,000 devices for bootlegging sports channels during World Cup

Saudi authorities cracked down on the sale and use of broadcasting devices used to bootleg sports channels, ahead of the start of the FIFA World Cup occurring this month. (AFP)
Updated 17 June 2018
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Saudi Arabia confiscates 4,000 devices for bootlegging sports channels during World Cup

  • Saudi authorities cracked down on the sale and use of broadcasting devices used to bootleg sports channels, ahead of the start of the FIFA World Cup occurring this month
  • ore than 8,000 such devices have been confiscated from retailers in the Kingdom “in the last few weeks”

JEDDAH: A new anti-piracy campaign toppled more than 4,000 devices in Saudi Arabia that hacked sports channels when agents conducted raids and confiscated them. Legal action has been taken against those involved in this illegal activity.
This is the latest in a series of actions taken by the Kingdom in its anti-piracy efforts. A spokesman for the Saudi Intellectual Property Authority (SIPA) ) told Arab News that the Kingdom is taking the issue seriously and is organizing and conducting raids in coordination with all concerned parties, and that more news would be announced later.
Earlier this month, Saudi authorities cracked down on the sale and use of broadcasting devices used to bootleg sports channels, ahead of the start of the FIFA World Cup occurring this month.
More than 8,000 such devices have been confiscated from retailers in the Kingdom “in the last few weeks,” according to authorities, who have launched formal proceedings against offending distributors.
The confiscated devices were destroyed in the presence of representatives from government agencies involved in the campaign. Saudi Arabia is expected to continue its oversight work against all outlets that may be committing such violations.
The scope of TV piracy in Saudi Arabia and the wider region is difficult to assess; research analysts IDC in 2015 estimated that illegal content distribution across the Middle East and Africa cost the industry more than $750 million per year.


Abdul-Mahdi: Relations between Iraq and GCC ‘must progress’

Updated 33 min 56 sec ago
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Abdul-Mahdi: Relations between Iraq and GCC ‘must progress’

  • Abdul-Mahdi and Al-Zayani discussed the development of relations between Iraq and GCC countries and issues of mutual interest
  • Abdul-Mahdi also attended the Saudi-Iraqi Business Forum, which included representatives from large Saudi companies

RIYADH: Relations between Iraq and the Gulf Cooperation Council are important and “must progress, ” Prime Minister Adel Abdul-Mahdi said on Thursday.
On the second day of his visit to Saudi Arabia, Abdul-Mahdi met with the secretary general of the GCC, Abdullatif bin Rashid Al-Zayani in Riyadh.
Abdul-Mahdi and Al-Zayani discussed the development of relations between Iraq and GCC countries and issues of mutual interest.
“Cooperation and economic relations must progress for the better,” Abdul-Mahdi said.

Saudi Arabia and Iraq have agreed to cooperate in security and intelligence matters, Iraqi Foreign Minister Mohammed Ali Al-Hakim told Al Arabiya television. 
Meanwhile, Abdul-Mahdi also attended the Saudi-Iraqi Business Forum, which included representatives from large Saudi companies.
He also inaugurated an exhibition on Wednesday called “Cities Destroyed by Terrorism” that is showing at the National Museum in Riyadh. The exhibition was organised by the Minister of Culture and the Arab World Institute in Paris.
The Iraqi prime minister arrived in Riyadh on Wednesday for a two-day visit to the Kingdom. He held talks with King Salman on relations between the two countries, and later met with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.


His visit to the Kingdom “symbolizes the Iraqi government's vision in aiming to bolster ties with the Kingdom in all fields,” the Iraqi prime minister said on Facebook.
The two countries signed 13 agreements and memorandums of understanding between their various ministries. The deals covered many areas including energy, education, culture and political consultation.