Shahidi shines as MTV awards show airs

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Yara Shahidi looked cooler than cool in an ice blue. (AFP)
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From left, Winston Duke, Chadwick Boseman and Michael B. Jordan accept the Best Movie award for ‘Black Panther.’ (AFP)
Updated 19 June 2018
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Shahidi shines as MTV awards show airs

  • Her hair was styled in a tightly curled bob styled with Pantene products and she made a make-up statement with metallic eyeshadow and bare lips

DUBAI: Iranian-American actress Yara Shahidi looked cooler than cool in an ice blue, custom-made Tory Burch suit on the MTV Movie and TV Awards’ red carpet over the weekend. The show aired on Monday night and saw superhero movie “Black Panther” make a killing, winning four trophies in a ceremony that also recognized those who stand up to bullying.

Shahidi, who shot to fame for her role in TV’s “Black-ish” and even scored her own spinoff series called “Grown-ish,” paired the sharp look with Louboutin shoes and Tiffany and Co jewelry.

Her hair was styled in a tightly curled bob styled with Pantene products and she made a make-up statement with metallic eyeshadow and bare lips.

At the award show, “Black Panther,” the predominantly black movie that has taken more than $1.3 billion at the global box-office, won best movie, best villain for Michael B. Jordan’s Killmonger and best performance and hero for star Chadwick Boseman.

Boseman, who plays the leader of the fictional African nation of Wakanda, gave his trophy to a man with no Hollywood connections, Reuters reported.

“An award for best hero is amazing but it’s even greater to acknowledge the heroes we have in real life,” said Boseman.

He brought on stage James Shaw Jr., a 29-year-old electrician who overpowered a gunman who killed four people at a Waffle House outlet in Nashville in April to save the lives of more customers.

“This is gonna live at your house,” Boseman said, handing the trophy to Shaw.

“Black Panther” actor Winston Duke thanked fans for supporting the movie, which has smashed Hollywood doubts about the broader appeal of black films to become the third highest-grossing film of all time in North America.

“Thank you all for investing not just in a beautiful story but for investing in a continued conversation on what this industry and what this culture can achieve,” Duke said.

The youth-oriented MTV network, known for its irreverent award shows, again dispensed with gender classifications, placing men and women together in performance categories in a move to embrace equality.

“Stranger Things” was named best TV show and Millie Bobby Brown, 14, won best TV performance for her role as Eleven. The British teenager, who deleted her Twitter account last week after a slew of hate-filled comments, used her acceptance speech to speak out against bullying.

“If you don’t have anything nice to say, just don’t say it. There should be no space in this world for bullying and I’m not going to tolerate it, and neither should you,” Brown said.

The MTV awards feature blockbuster movie and popular TV shows and has established itself as an antidote to the winter Hollywood awards season, which honors more serious fare. Winners are chosen by fans voting online.

“Wonder Woman” actress Gal Gadot won for best fight and “Keeping Up with the Kardashians” was voted best reality show.

MTV Movie and TV Awards host Tiffany Haddish won best comedic performance for her breakout role in the raunchy 2017 movie “Girls Trip.”

“Jurassic World” and “Avengers: Infinity War” actor Chris Pratt was given the annual Generation Award, joining the ranks of previous winners Tom Cruise, Sandra Bullock and Will Smith.

Actress and writer Lena Waithe, who last year became the first black woman to win a screenwriting Emmy, was awarded the Trailblazer trophy.


Miles Davis and all that jazz

Miles Davis teaches actress Jeanne Moreau to play the trumpet. (AFP)
Updated 19 September 2018
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Miles Davis and all that jazz

  • Thankfully, the tapes were rolling on Dec. 19, 1970 — just one more historic evening when Miles changed music forever, before tearing up the rulebook again in pursuit of that most quixotic muse

ROTTERDAM: Miles Davis once claimed to have “changed music five or six times,” and while a man known for neither understatement nor modesty, some argue that the jazz icon sold himself short — biographer John Szwed once traced at least nine musical subgenres either born or shaped by Davis’ innovations. 

The revolutionary shopping list includes inventing cool-jazz in the 1940s, spawning hard bop, modal jazz and third-stream in the 1950s, and pioneering post-bop in the 1960s. However, the stylistic sea change Davis devoted most blood, sweat and tape toward were the ‘70s adventures in fusion most often epitomized by “B*****s Brew”, the first of ten dense double-LPs (plus two singles) recorded in just five years — which over 44 sides of vinyl explored and/or anticipated jazz-rock, funk, ambient, minimalism, worldbeat, psychedelic, space-jazz and even techno.

Trippy stuff, for sure, but not always easily listenable. Not the case with the misleadingly titled “Live-Evil” (1971) — a part-studio, mostly live set which captures Davis’ increasingly oblique electric permutations at their most fun, and funky. The bulk of the 102-minute runtime documents a one-night encounter with guest guitarist John McLaughlin, whose furious fretwork conceals an unusually ragged looseness and bluesy simplicity.

Such a raw approach suits the thick, squelchy grooves conjured by electric bassist Michael Henderson — recently recruited from Aretha Franklin’s band — grounding the untethered attack of drummer Jack DeJohnette’s crazed rock rhythms.

Recorded at the height of his boxing obsession, there’s a controlled aggression to Davis’ playing — the hurried rhythms of jabs and parries, ducks and dives — his horn harshly amplified through a wah-wah guitar pedal in a wholehearted Hendrix homage.

What little harmony there is comes from Keith Jarrett, whose overdriven organ scurries lend a frazzled energy and cerebral counter-balance. Soon after Jarrett — now the most renowned solo pianist on the planet — would quit and disavow electronic instruments altogether.

Thankfully, the tapes were rolling on Dec. 19, 1970 — just one more historic evening when Miles changed music forever, before tearing up the rulebook again in pursuit of that most quixotic muse.