Ministry of Media rejects UEFA’s ‘irresponsible accusations’ of BeoutQ being based in Saudi Arabia

The Ministry of Media unequivocally rejected, what it called, UEFA’s baseless claim that BeoutQ ‘is based in Saudi Arabia.’ (BeoutQ screenshot)
Updated 23 June 2018
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Ministry of Media rejects UEFA’s ‘irresponsible accusations’ of BeoutQ being based in Saudi Arabia

  • The Ministry of Media said it understands that BeoutQ’s set top boxes are available in many places, including Qatar and Eastern Europe. Moreover, UEFA’s irresponsible statement is contrary to what is occurring in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
  • The Ministry of Media was informed that beIN Sports was the source of UEFA’s reckless allegation. beIN Sports is a subsidiary of the Al Jazeera Media Network (Al Jazeera). KSA banned Al Jazeera’s broadcasts in KSA, beginning in June 2017.

JEDDAH: The Ministry of Media says it has become aware of irresponsible accusations made in a UEFA press release regarding an entity known as BeoutQ. UEFA baselessly claims that BeoutQ “is based in Saudi Arabia.”

The Ministry of Media unequivocally rejects this claim. The Ministry of Media said it understands that BeoutQ’s set top boxes are available in many places, including Qatar and Eastern Europe. Moreover, UEFA’s irresponsible statement is contrary to what is occurring in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA).

Through its Ministry of Commerce and Investment, KSA has relentlessly combatted BeoutQ’s activities within the country. For instance, the Ministry of Commerce has seized thousands of set-top boxes that would otherwise be used to violate intellectual property (IP) in KSA.

The Government of Saudi Arabia is and will remain devoted to protecting IP rights within the country. The Ministry of Media was informed that beIN Sports was the source of UEFA’s reckless allegation. beIN Sports is a subsidiary of the Al Jazeera Media Network (Al Jazeera). KSA banned Al Jazeera’s broadcasts in KSA, beginning in June 2017.

Al Jazeera is Qatar’s principal media arm for supporting terrorism and promoting instability in the region. Al Jazeera provides a media platform for terrorists to propagate their violent message. KSA has also banned broadcasts by beIN Sports in Saudi Arabia for the same reason.

Al Jazeera’s response to the ban was to escalate its campaign of defamation against KSA. While beIN Sports’s broadcasts, too, have long been used as vehicles for offensive anti-Saudi invective, beIN Sports has amplified its offensive propaganda during the World Cup 2018 — which is ironic because the World Cup is supposed to be a demonstration of how football can bring nations together in harmony.

During the World Cup, beIN has defamed the Saudi Football Federation, insulted Saudi Arabia and its fans and has politicized the World Cup platform in violation of all rules and codes of conduct. For these reasons Al Jazeera and its subsidiary beIN, will never broadcast in Saudi Arabia.

The Ministry of Media accordingly urges that responsible news organizations view the reckless press release by UEFA, as well as beIN Sports’ other unsubstantiated allegations, with suspicion.


Google Doodle remembers discovery of Egyptian Khufu Ship

Updated 26 May 2019
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Google Doodle remembers discovery of Egyptian Khufu Ship

  • The ship is believed to have been built for Khufu, the second pharaoh of the fourth dynasty of the Old Kingdom of Egypt
  • Over 1,200 pieces were reassembled by the Egyptian Department of Antiquities in order to restore the ship

DUBAI: Today’s Google Doodle marks the 65th anniversary of the discovery of the Khufu Ship, one of the world’s oldest and largest boats, found in Egypt.

The ship, now preserved in the Giza Solar Boat Museum, is believed to have been built for Khufu, the second pharaoh of the fourth dynasty of the Old Kingdom of Egypt, who is entombed inside the Great Pyramid of Giza.

Unearthed in 1954 by archeologist Kamal El-Mallakh, remnants of the massive ship were found buried under a stone wall on the south side of the pyramid.

Over 1,200 pieces were reassembled by the Egyptian Department of Antiquities in order to restore the 143-feet long, 19.6-feet wide vessel. The whole process took over a decade to finish.

It’s still unclear what the ship was originally intended for – some experts say it was used to transport Khufu’s remains to his final resting place, while others believe it was placed at the location to transport him to the afterlife, according to Ancient Egyptian tradition.

Some experts suggested that the ship might contain clues to the construction of the pyramids, which still causes debate among scholars.