FaceOf: Saud Al-Qahtani, Saudi Royal Court adviser

Saud Al-Qahtani
Updated 23 June 2018
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FaceOf: Saud Al-Qahtani, Saudi Royal Court adviser

  • Saud Al-Qahtani holds several certificates in law and administration, and has been an opinion writer for many Saudi and Arab newspapers and magazines
  • Saud Al-Qahtani promoted to the rank of captain before he pursued a master’s degree with honors in criminal justice from Naif Arab University for Security Sciences (NAUSS)

JEDDAH: Saud Al-Qahtani is an adviser to the Royal Court, as well as the supervisor general of the Center for Studies and Information Affairs in Saudi Arabia.
He addressed Qatar’s manipulation of BeIN Sports on Friday, confirming that the Kingdom is taking appropriate legal measures against the Doha-owned station due to its incorporation of politics during the broadcast of the World Cup Saudi matches.
Born in Riyadh on June 7, 1978, Al-Qahtani completed his schooling in Riyadh and was a distinguished student, among the top ten in the Riyadh region.
He received his bachelor’s degree in law from King Saud University, then joined the officer training course in the Royal Saudi Air Force and graduated with honors with the rank of sergeant.
He was later promoted to the rank of captain before he pursued a master’s degree with honors in criminal justice from Naif Arab University for Security Sciences (NAUSS).
He holds several certificates in law and administration, and has been an opinion writer for many Saudi and Arab newspapers and magazines.
He is considered one of the most influential figures on the Saudi Twitter scene.
In 2003, he was assigned as a legal adviser to the secretariat to then Crown Prince Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz, and by 2004 he became the secretariat’s media director.
In 2008, he served as the director general of media monitoring and analysis for the Royal Court.
In 2012, he became an adviser to the Royal Court and was given the rank of a minister in 2015.
Al-Qahtani is also a member of the board of directors for institutes such as King Abdul Aziz University, the Misk Foundation, Misk Schools, the Royal Commission for Al-Ula, and the Saudi Union for Cyber Security and Programming. He is also an honorary member of Al-Hilal football club.


Misk Global Forum: UAE Higher Education Minister aces ‘job interview’

Updated 58 min 8 sec ago
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Misk Global Forum: UAE Higher Education Minister aces ‘job interview’

  • ‘You need a core major. Academic background is still important’

RIYADH: The opening session on the second day of the Misk Global Forum began with a brain teaser – how many golf balls can you fit in a school bus? – as part of a job interview, but not just with any applicant.

Dr. Ahmad Belhoul Al-Falasi, the UAE’s Minister of State for Higher Education and Advanced Skills, talked about higher learning and his career in the format of a job interview, conducted by moderator Razan Alayed, an advisor to the Education and Human Resources Council in the UAE.

Al-Falasi said he was surprised that even though he went to very good schools and had a PhD in engineering, he got rejected when applying to many companies because they said he was overqualified. He realized he was underqualified in consulting, so he started to work on that. His learning? “People appreciated the skills I had, not my education.”  

Still, Al-Falasi said it’s important to have a specialization in higher education. “You need a core major. Academic background is still important.”  

To be successful, he said a person needs to be confident and passionate, and that it’s important to have skills of negotiation and articulation.

“I’m not the smartest person,” he said, rather modestly. “If I have to pick one skill, it will be my capacity to adapt.”

Al-Falasi said technology is helping education evolve: “Today with technology, you can have access to the best classes in the world. Data is also important, many say. A lot of technology is built on understanding.”  

At the end of his interview, when Al-Falasi was asked about his salary expectation. Without pause, he said if it’s for a job at Misk, the figure doesn’t matter.

“We all feel very passionate and positive today, especially with what’s happening in Misk,” he said. “All eyes are on Saudi Arabia today.”