Muslim World League chief wins international award

Muslim World League Secretary-General Dr. Mohammed bin Abdulkarim Al-Issa receives the Galileo International Award 2018 in Florence, Italy. Photo/Supplied
Updated 03 July 2018
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Muslim World League chief wins international award

  • The Galileo Award is named after the Italian reformist, mathematician, and physicist Galileo Galilei, who was sentenced to death by the Inquisition in 1616 for religious heresy
  • In March 2008, the Vatican went some way to amending its mistakes toward Galileo by placing a statue of him inside the Vatican walls

JEDDAH: Muslim World League (MWL) Secretary-General Dr. Mohammed bin Abdulkarim Al-Issa has won the Galileo International Award 2018 in Florence, Italy.
The Galileo Foundation said Al-Issa received the award for his excellence in Islamic works and international achievements, praising his leading roles in promoting civilizational peace and harmony.
In his speech at the awards ceremony, Al-Issa said it had been his pleasure to meet a distinguished elite of clergy, politicians and intellectuals in Florence, the birthplace of the European Renaissance, pointing to the importance of adhering to the common denominators that unite people despite the diversity among nations.
The MWL chief highlighted the negative effects of private ambitions and political and material interests on overall peace and harmony, and the threat they pose to the fence that protects rights and freedoms and the resulting brutal conflict. He stressed the real victory for each cause lies in its soft power and moral logic.
Al-Issa noted that those who have a just cause are eligible to conquer, provided their victory is civilized, because materialism does not recognize the logic of ethics and values. Al-Issa said that human barbarism should not be overlooked by the international community, spiritual leaders, or the general opinion leaders of different groups, pointing to the seriousness of religious, sectarian and political extremism.
He called for investment in awareness by educating future generations about common values starting from the early stages of life.
He thanked Alfonso de Vergils, Marco Giorgetta and all the other members of the award committee for the award which, he said, puts more responsibilities on his shoulders.
The Galileo Award is named after the Italian reformist, mathematician, and physicist Galileo Galilei, who was sentenced to death by the Inquisition in 1616 for religious heresy. In March 2008, the Vatican went some way to amending its mistakes toward Galileo by placing a statue of him inside the Vatican walls. The award is granted this year for leadership in thought.
The Muslim community in Italy lauded the MWL for its leading role in the service of Islam. Leaders of the Muslim community also stressed the significance of the MWL and the universality of its discourse, which is helping to face negative campaigns about Muslims and Islam.


US denies ‘final conclusion’ reached on Khashoggi case

Updated 18 November 2018
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US denies ‘final conclusion’ reached on Khashoggi case

  • A US newspaper published what it claimed were details of an intelligence report on the case
  • ‘The State Department will continue to seek all relevant facts’

JEDDAH: The US government denied on Saturday it had reached a final conclusion over the killing of Jamal Khashoggi after a US newspaper published what it claimed were details of an intelligence report on the case. 
“Recent reports indicating that the US government has made a final conclusion are inaccurate,” State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said.
“There remain numerous unanswered questions with respect to the murder of Mr. Khashoggi. The State Department will continue to seek all relevant facts,” she said.
“In the meantime, we will continue to consult Congress, and work with other nations to hold accountable those involved in the killing of Jamal Khashoggi.”

But President Donald Trump told reporters on Saturday that his administration would get “a very full report,” including who was responsible for Khashoggi’s death, on Monday or Tuesday.
The Washington Post published an article citing anonymous sources, who it says are close to the CIA which suggests the Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman ordered the killing — something Saudi Arabia vehemently denies.
The Kingdom’s public prosecutor on Thursday released details of its investigation, saying the decision to kill the journalist was made by the head of a rogue mission during an attempt to repatriate him. The prosecutor is seeking the death penalty for five of the suspects. 
On Saturday, Donald Trump spoke with CIA Director Gina Haspel and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo from Air Force One, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said. 
Trump praised US relations with Saudi Arabia when he was asked about the case. Saudi Arabia is “a truly spectacular ally in terms of jobs and economic development,” the US president said.
Earlier, Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to the US Prince Khalid bin Salman, strongly denied the Washington Post story, and said he did not tell Khashoggi to go to Turkey, as the report claimed. 
“I never talked to him by phone and certainly never suggested he go to Turkey for any reason. I ask the US government to release any information regarding this claim,” Prince Khalid said
Khashoggi, a Saudi who lived in the United States, was a columnist for the Post.
He was killed on Oct. 2 at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul after he went to get marriage documents.