Taleedah Tamer makes waves in Paris

1 / 3
Taleedah Tamer wore a white suit by Antonio Grimaldi. (AFP)
2 / 3
Taleedah walked the runway for Italian designer Antonio Grimaldi. (AFP)
3 / 3
The Saudi model dazzled in a column gown. (AFP)
Updated 04 July 2018
0

Taleedah Tamer makes waves in Paris

JEDDAH: Saudi model Taleedah Tamer, 17, turned heads this week when she made her debut at Haute Couture Fashion Week in Paris, walking the runway for Italian designer Antonio Grimaldi on Monday.
The up-and-coming beauty wore a sleek white pant suit with a structured cape and slit sleeves and then strutted down the runway in a pale pink column gown, embroidered with vertically-lined sequins and adorned with a feather accent on one shoulder.
The model took to Instagram to document her whirlwind experience in Paris, thanking the designer before adding she was heading out for sushi after the show.
“Thank you @antoniogrimaldi. Now sushiiii (sic),” she captioned a casual close-up photo.
After landing her first contracts modeling for Karloff jewelry and Rubaiyat, the Saudi model made fashion waves by gracing the latest cover of Harper’s Bazaar Arabia.
Born and raised in Jeddah to a Saudi father and Italian mother, Tamer enjoyed support from both her parents to pursue a career in the fashion industry. Her father, Ayman Tamer, is chairman of the Tamer Group, a health care, pharmaceutical and beauty company, while her mother, Cristina, is a former model who worked for Giorgio Armani, La Perla and Gianfranco Ferre.
In a recent interview with Arab News, Tamer revealed her fashion goals: “I do have professional and personal goals in many different fields within the fashion industry, but in regards to publications, being able to grace the cover of any of Vogue’s ‘Big Four’ — the French, Italian, British or American Vogue — would be such an honor.
“On the runway, I’ve always wanted to walk for Armani since my mother walked for them when she was younger, so that would be special. In photography, I would love to work with Steven Meisel. Some destinations I would love to visit and work on in location are Bora Bora, India, Croatia and Japan.”
The model counts Gisele Bundchen and Dutch-Moroccan-Egyptian star Imaan Hammam among her modeling inspirations.
Tamer, a recent graduate of the British International School of Jeddah, hopes to continue her modelling career while furthering her education in business marketing.
Designer Grimaldi, who debuted Tamer on the Paris runway, has been dressing Middle Eastern clients for two decades in his bespoke styles.
“No one would have imagined this,” he told Harper’s Bazaar Arabia on the idea of a Saudi model on the runway and the global reaction to it.
“People think that behind the abaya, there is something very far away from them. That is not true. All women are the same, they like the same things. This is the perfect time to show that.”
Meanwhile on Tuesday, models strutted past Parisian landmarks, including the green book stalls that line the river Seine, at Chanel’s fashion show, as the luxury label mocked up an entire cityscape to present its latest haute couture collection.
The fashion house, known for its extravagant runway displays, set the scene for its winter styles under an imposing recreation of the domed, neoclassical Institut de France that houses the country’s language council and looms over the river.
The first styles out of the blocks included an array of tweed suits — a Chanel staple reimagined for every collection by octogenarian designer Karl Lagerfeld — in shades of grey that evoked chic Parisian looks from the 1940s, Reuters reported.
However, the jackets and straight skirts were updated to feature slits, creating flared sleeves as models displayed glimpses of long, fingerless gloves.
Other standout pieces included puffy party dresses with feathered hemlines and edgier, rock-style gowns with a metallic glint.
Paris Haute Couture Fashion Week runs until July 5.
Only a handful of brands belong to the select haute couture club — to qualify, brands have to be approved by French fashion’s governing body and fulfil criteria covering staffing, skills and the service offered to private clients.


Lefaucheux revolver ‘Van Gogh killed himself with’ up for auction

Updated 17 June 2019
0

Lefaucheux revolver ‘Van Gogh killed himself with’ up for auction

  • Van Gogh experts believe that he shot himself with the gun near the village of Auvers-sur-Oise north of Paris
  • The seven-millimeter Lefaucheux revolver is expected to fetch up to $67,000

PARIS: The revolver with which Vincent van Gogh is believed to have shot himself is to go under the hammer Wednesday at a Paris auction house.
Billed as “the most famous weapon in the history of art,” the seven mm Lefaucheux revolver is expected to fetch up to $67,000 (€60,000).
Van Gogh experts believe that he shot himself with the revolver near the village of Auvers-sur-Oise north of Paris, where he spent the last few months of his life in 1890.
Discovered by a farmer in 1965 in the same field where the troubled Dutch painter is thought to have fatally wounded himself, the gun has already been exhibited at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.
While Art Auction, who are selling the gun, say there is no way of being absolutely certain that it is the fatal weapon, tests showed it had been in the ground for 75 years, which would fit.
The Dutch artist had borrowed the gun from the owner of the inn in the village where he was staying.
He died 36 hours later after staggering wounded back to the auberge in the dark.
It was not his first dramatic act of self-harm. Two years earlier in 1888, he cut off his ear before offering it to a woman in a brothel in Arles in the south of France.
While most art historians agree that Van Gogh killed himself, that assumption has been questioned in recent years, with some researchers claiming that the fatal shot may have been fired accidentally by two local boys playing with the weapon in the field.
That theory won fresh support from a new biopic of the artist starring Willem Dafoe, “At Eternity’s Gate.”
Its director, the renowned American painter Julian Schnabel, said that Van Gogh had painted 75 canvasses in his 80 days at Auvers-sur-Oise and was unlikely to be suicidal.
The legendary French screenwriter Jean-Claude Carriere — who co-wrote the script with Schnabel — insisted that there “is absolutely no proof he killed himself.
“Do I believe that Van Gogh killed himself? Absolutely not!” he declared when the film was premiered at the Venice film festival last September.
He said Van Gogh painted some of his best work in his final days, including his “Portrait of Dr. Gachet,” the local doctor who later tried to save his life.
It set a world record when it sold for $82.5 million in 1990.
The bullet Dr. Gachet extracted from Van Gogh’s chest was the same caliber as the one used by the Lefaucheux revolver.
“Van Gogh was working constantly. Every day he made a new work. He was not at all sad,” Carriere argued.
In the film the gun goes off after the two young boys, who were brothers, got into a struggle with the bohemian stranger.
Auction Art said that the farmer who found the gun in 1965 gave it to the owners of the inn at Auvers-sur-Oise, whose family are now selling it.
“Technical tests on the weapon have shown the weapon was used and indicate that it stayed in the ground for a period that would coincide with 1890,” it said.
“All these clues give credence to the theory that this is the weapon used in the suicide.”
That did not exclude, the auction house added, that the gun could also have been hidden or abandoned by the two young brothers in the field.
The auction comes as crowds are flocking to an immersive Van Gogh exhibition in the French capital which allows “the audience to enter his landscapes” through projections on the gallery’s walls, ceilings and floors.
“Van Gogh, Starry Night” runs at the Atelier des Lumieres in the east of the city until December.