Lebanese designers show off their couture creations

Updated 04 July 2018
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Lebanese designers show off their couture creations

  • Georges Hobeika unveiled a Fall/Winter  collection that was teeming with feathers, tea-length skirts and frequent visual references to nature’s most elegant bird, the swan

DUBAI: As Haute Couture Fashion Week in Paris winds down, we are still daydreaming about the dazzling display designers from the region showcased in the culture capital.

Lebanese designer Rabih Kayrouz put on a vibrant show on Monday, sending models down the catwalk in Dorothy-inspired ginghams and daring pop art-style primary colors. Over exaggerated, frilled sleeves and a devil-may-care attitude toward mixing prints made his Spring 2019 ready-to-wear collection stand out — it was fun and instantly wearable.

Countryman Georges Hobeika took things in precisely the opposite direction, and it was breathtaking to behold. The Beirut-based designer unveiled a Fall/Winter  collection that was teeming with feathers, tea-length skirts and frequent visual references to nature’s most elegant bird, the swan. Soft, pale pinks melted into luscious, deep violets and cobalt blues in a line that was feminine and not without its quirks. 

Meanwhile, Bollywood favorite Rami Kadi unveiled an Aztec-inspired collection of pastel-hued ballgowns, as well as a wedding dress that twinkled with embedded fairy lights, iridescent ostrich feathers and wispy metallic fronds. Peaches, forget-me-not blues and cream colors, along with holographic sequins and delicate crystal embellishments, marked this collection.

Hobeika put on a stunning show. AFP


Curious foreigners get rare chance to sample Emirati culture

Updated 19 May 2019
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Curious foreigners get rare chance to sample Emirati culture

DUBAI: No question was off limits for curious tourists and foreign residents of Dubai wanting to learn more about Emirati culture and the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan.
Emiratis make up less than 10% of those living in Dubai, the most populated emirate in the seven-emirate United Arab Emirates federation, making it hard for foreigners to meet them.
Dubai goes to great lengths to market itself as open to different cultures and faiths as the Middle East’s financial, trade and leisure center, and a government cultural center is inviting visitors to find out more about Emirati life.
“There are no offending questions,” said Emirati Rashid Al-Tamimi from the Sheikh Mohammed Center for Cultural Understanding.
“How do you worship, what is the mosque, why do you wear white, why do women wear black ... is everybody rich in this country?“
Emirati volunteers gathered at a majlis — the traditional sitting room where the end-of-fast iftar meal is served at floor-level — were asked about dating and marriage, what they think of Dubai’s comparatively liberal dress codes for foreigners, and aspects of the Muslim faith.
“We learn from them, they learn from us. (Foreigners) have been here a long time and I feel they see themselves as Emiratis, and we are proud that they do so,” said Majida Al-Gharib a student volunteer.
Visitors broke the day’s fast with dates and water, before sampling Emirati cuisine, including biryani and machboos rice and meat dishes.
Seven-year-old Anthony from Poland, who goes to school in Dubai, said he came to find out more about the breaking of the fast meal because many of his friends at school do it.
2019 has been designated the Year of Tolerance in the United Arab Emirates and there is a minister of state for tolerance.