Gunmen kill Saudi security officer and foreign national in Buraidah attack

Security official and an expatriate killed at a checkpoint in Buraidah, Saudi Arabia. (File photo: AFP)
Updated 09 July 2018
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Gunmen kill Saudi security officer and foreign national in Buraidah attack

  • Two of the attackers were also killed and another injured, the Saudi Press Agency reports.
  • Saudi Arabia is at the forefront in the fight against terrorism

JEDDAH: A member of Saudi Arabia’s security forces and a foreign citizen were killed in an attack at a checkpoint in Buraidah, Qassim Province, on Sunday.
Two of the attackers were also killed and another injured in the ensuing gunfight, the Saudi Press Agency reported.
The three men opened fire at 3:45 p.m. local time from a Hyundai Elantra, an Interior Ministry spokesman said.
“A security checkpoint on the Buraydah-Tarfiyah road in Qassim region came under fire from three terrorists riding in a vehicle on Sunday afternoon,” the ministry said in a statement.
“Two of the terrorists were killed and a third was wounded and transferred to hospital,” it added.
The dead security officer was identified as Sergeant Sulaiman Abdul Aziz Al-Abdel Latif. The foreign national who was killed was from Bangladesh. An investigation is under way.
Saudi Arabia is at the forefront in the fight against terrorism. The Kingdom has also been a victim of terrorist attacks. The Saudi security forces have been able to thwart several terrorist attacks in the past. In February 2018, a Specialized Criminal Court in Riyadh sentenced to death a Saudi for joining the Tarout Battalion terrorist cell.
He was convicted of harming national security, killing and intimidating security forces, attacking public property, undertaking acts of sabotage and chaos, obstructing roads, inciting strife and division in the country, and participating in demonstrations in Qatif.
The convict threw Molotov cocktails at security forces, shouted anti-government slogans at demonstrations, and used his car to drive around other wanted fugitives.  


Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan arrives in Madinah during maiden visit to Saudi Arabia

Updated 24 min 42 sec ago
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Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan arrives in Madinah during maiden visit to Saudi Arabia

  • Although bilateral relations and regional security are on the agenda of Imran Khan’s visit, a more urgent priority will be a possible economic bailout package from the KSA
  • The prime minister will call on King Salman and hold a bilateral meeting with the crown prince, said the Pakistan Foreign Office

ISLAMABAD: Prime Minister Imran Khan arrived in Madinah, Saudi Arabia, beginning the initial leg of his first foreign tour since taking office in August.
The premier was welcomed at Madinah Airport by the Governor of Madinah, Faisal bin Salman, Pakistani Ambassador to Saudi Arabia Hasham bin Saddique, and other members of the Pakistani consulate.
Khan, accompanied by Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi, Finance Minister Asad Umar, Information Minister Fawad Chaudhry and Adviser for Commerce Abdul Razak Dawood, is also scheduled to perform Umrah during his two-day stay in Saudi Arabia.
“The prime minister will call on His Majesty King Salman bin Abdulaziz and hold a bilateral meeting with the crown prince (His Royal Highness Mohammad Bin Salman). The king will also host a state banquet for the prime minister at the Royal Court. Accompanying ministers will also meet their counterparts to discuss bilateral cooperation,” reads a statement issued by the Foreign Office.
The Secretary-General of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation, Dr. Yousef bin Ahmed Al-Othaimeen, will also call on the PM during his visit.
Although bilateral relations and the regional security situation are on the agenda of Khan’s visit, a more pertinent, urgent priority will be a possible economic bailout package sought from Saudi Arabia by the new Pakistani Government.
In 2014, six months after Pakistan obtained its last IMF bailout, Saudi Arabia loaned Pakistan $1.5 billion, which the government used to strengthen its currency. Pakistan’s current account deficit increased to 43 percent ($18 billion) in the fiscal year that ended June 30.
Analysts, however, told Reuters that a fresh bailout package from the IMF, which would be Pakistan’s 13th since the late 1980s, is inevitable.
While the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf Government has been debating several options to plug the hole in Pakistan’s rapidly draining foreign exchange reserves, it is also avidly trying to seek financial assistance from allied countries (including Saudi Arabia, China and the UAE) as opposed to going to the IMF.
Before the visit, Finance Minister Asad Umar said that IMF assistance would remain a “fallback option.”