Waad Al-Shamal plant to help resettle Saudi Arabia’s electric power industry

The SEC has invested more than SR3.75 billion ($1 billion) in the power plant that is equipped with mirrors that generate electricity using solar power. (REUTERS)
Updated 11 July 2018
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Waad Al-Shamal plant to help resettle Saudi Arabia’s electric power industry

  • The new power plant relies on the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project, modern gas unit technologies that contribute to reducing carbon and nitrogen oxide emissions
  • The company signed a contract with an international company to create the plant in December 2015, with a total capacity of 1,390 mw

JEDDAH: The Saudi Electricity Co. (SEC) started operating the “Waad Al-Shamal” plant, which partially depends on solar power to generate electricity, as part of its efforts to support economic and development projects and industrial areas through out the Kingdom.
SEC Chief Executive Ziad bin Mohammed Al-Shiha confirmed that the new power plant, which operates on natural gas as essential fuel, is within the company’s comprehensive strategy for advanced electricity projects.
It takes into account the region’s environmental conditions, reduces thermionic emissions and fuel consumption while providing for the needs of the industrial city, in addition to supporting the Kingdom going in the direction of renewable energy.
Al-Shiha said that the SEC has invested more than SR3.75 billion ($1 billion) in the power plant that is equipped with mirrors that generate electricity using solar power. It has also invested in establishing transfer stations, air- and ground-based transmission lines to supply Waad Al-Shamal and its industrial projects with electric power to promote and complete the electrical network in the north of the Kingdom and complete linking all electrical networks in the Kingdom.
The new power plant relies on the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project, modern gas unit technologies that contribute to reducing carbon and nitrogen oxide emissions (therefore reducing pollution), increasing efficiency and producing 50 megawatts of electric power through concentrated solar power.
The company also strives to save four million barrels of equivalent fuel during its operation.
The CEO said: “The execution of the power plant started in April 2014, after signing contracts to supply, install, test and operate four generators with a total capacity of 1,204 MVA, 61 dividers, two capacitors and a reactor.
“The company signed a contract with an international company to create the plant in December 2015, with a total capacity of 1,390 megawatts.”
On the support of the mining industry in the Kingdom, Al-Shiha confirmed that the electrical projects in the area will contribute to developing the northern border area, where tremendous reserves of crude phosphate abound, in addition to different types of ore which provide an opportunity to establish quarries and manufacturing industries and reinforce the Kingdom’s role in the mining industry internationally.
He also said that the new power plant will play a strategic role in linking the region with Egypt and Europe in the future.
The Waad Al-Shamal power plant includes the first locally made turbine by General Electric.


KSA grants $84.7bn in aid to 79 countries: KSRelief chief

Dr. Abdullah Al-Rabeeah, general supervisor of the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief), speaks at the University of Warsaw on Saturday. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 11 min 44 sec ago
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KSA grants $84.7bn in aid to 79 countries: KSRelief chief

  • Al-Rabeeah said that KSRelief was running a program to rehabilitate Yemeni children recruited by the Houthi militias

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia has given $84.7 billion in foreign aid to 79 countries between 1996-2018, according to Dr. Abdullah Al-Rabeeah, general supervisor of the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief).
Al-Rabeeah highlighted Saudi Arabia’s contributions to international humanitarian and relief work, and said that the Kingdom had saved millions of people from conflicts and crises, regardless of their religion or ethnicity.
Al-Rabeeah was speaking during a seminar on the Kingdom’s humanitarian efforts at the University of Warsaw on Saturday, in the presence of Saudi Ambassador to Poland Mohammed Madani, Ambassador of Yemen to Poland Mervat Majali, and officials of the Foreign Ministry of Poland.
The royal decree establishing KSRelief was issued on May 13, 2015. Since then, it has carried out 482 projects in 42 countries worth $924,553,000. About 86 percent of the projects have been allocated to Yemen with a value of $659,271,000.
Al-Rabeeah said that the center implemented 206 projects for women worth $341,481,000, as well as 171 projects for children worth $504,962,000.
He added that the Kingdom had taken in 561,911 Yemeni refugees, 283,449 Syrian refugees and 249,669 refugees from Myanmar, the equivalent of 5.36 percent of the population of Saudi Arabia, putting it in second place internationally in terms of the number of refugees accepted.
Al-Rabeeah said that total Saudi assistance to Yemen since 2015 had reached $11.18 billion, noting that KSRelief has carried out 294 projects in Yemen in partnership with 80 UN and international and local NGOs.
Al-Rabeeah said that the response of KSRelief to the appeal by the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF for $66.7 million to combat the cholera epidemic in Yemen, as well as the projects allocated by KSRelief for women in Yemen from 2015 to date, amounted to 132 projects valued at $281,457,000. There have been 136 projects for children worth $469,867,000.
He highlighted that the Saudi project for mine clearance in Yemen, “Masam,” had been conducted by more than 400 people working in 32 teams within Yemeni territory during the preparation phase, and five specialized teams for rapid intervention, benefiting 9 million beneficiaries.
The costs of the project amounted to $40 million in the governorates of Marib, Aden, Taiz and Sanaa. More than 1 million land mines had been planted in Yemen, more than the number planted in World War II, he said.
Al-Rabeeah said that KSRelief was running a program to rehabilitate Yemeni children recruited by the Houthi militias, who use them as human shields. KSRelief is rehabilitating and providing care for 2,000 children through social, psychological, cultural and sports programs.