ThePlace: One of Saudi Arabia's highest peaks

Updated 16 October 2018
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ThePlace: One of Saudi Arabia's highest peaks

  • Jabal Souda is part of a mountain range called the Sarawat Mountains, the largest in Saudi Arabia

Jabal Souda is one of the highest peaks in Saudi Arabia, and is located 25 kilometers from Abha city, Asir.
It is about 2,800 meters above sea level and is one of the most vegetated areas in the Kingdom.
Asir is located on a high plate and receives the most rainfall in the Kingdom. Jabal Souda’s weather temperature is the coolest in the Kingdom, and it is widely praised for displaying the most attractive and dramatic views.
According to the Saudi Press Agency (SPA), the highlands of Asir have witnessed rain and moderate weather temperatures that have attracted large numbers of visitors from all over the Kingdom and beyond.
Roads leading to famous parks in the region, such as Al-Souda, Bani Mazen village, Al-Habala, Al-Faraa, and the provinces of Namas and Tanuma, have seen a large volume of tourist traffic.
The tourism services in Abha have proved useful to visitors. The cable car experience provides an opportunity for visitors to see the beauty of nature in Asir, which is highlighted during the summer season.
Abha attracts guests and visitors seeking the refreshing atmosphere and landscapes.
Jabal Souda is part of a mountain range called the Sarawat Mountains, the largest in Saudi Arabia.


Al-Jubeir: Saudi-led coalition ‘working with UN to end Yemen conflict’

The Houthis should engage in the political process and respond to the will of the international community to end the war and end the coup against the legitimate government, said Saudi Arabia's foreign minister. (AFP)
Updated 16 November 2018
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Al-Jubeir: Saudi-led coalition ‘working with UN to end Yemen conflict’

  • Since day one, we said that the solution… is a political solution, says Saudi FM
  • Al-Jubeir: Saudi Arabia is the largest provider of humanitarian aid to Yemen, providing more than $13 billion since the start of the conflict

RIYADH: The Saudi-led coalition is working with UN envoy Martin Griffith to reach a political solution to the conflict in Yemen based on UN Security Council resolution 2216, the Gulf Initiative and the outcomes of Yemeni national dialogue, the Saudi foreign minister said on Thursday. 

“Since day one, we said that the solution… is a political solution, and the solution should lead to the restoration of legitimacy in Yemen,” said Adel Al-Jubeir.

“We support a peaceful solution in Yemen. We support the efforts of the UN envoy for the Yemeni cause,” he added.

“We are committed to providing all humanitarian support to our brothers there. We are also working on the post-war reconstruction of Yemen.” The Kingdom supports the envoy’s efforts to hold negotiations at the end of November, added Al-Jubeir.

Saudi Arabia is the largest provider of humanitarian aid to Yemen, providing more than $13 billion since the start of the conflict, he said.

In contrast, Houthi militias are imposing restrictions on Yemeni cities and villages, leading to starvation, he added. 

They are also seizing humanitarian aid and preventing Yemenis from getting cholera vaccinations, Al-Jubeir said. 

The Houthis fire ballistic missiles indiscriminately at Saudi Arabia, use children as fighters and plant mines across Yemen, he added. 

The Houthis should engage in the political process and respond to the will of the international community to end the war and end the coup against the legitimate government, he said.

Saudi Arabia did not want the conflict in Yemen; it was imposed on the Kingdom, Al-Jubeir added. 

Saudi Arabia worked with other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) member states to develop the Gulf Initiative. 

This led to a transition from former President Ali Abdullah Saleh to the internationally recognized government headed by current President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi.

The Kingdom also worked to develop Yemeni national dialogue that led to a Yemeni vision regarding the country’s future.

A new Yemeni constitution was about to be drafted when the Houthis seized much of the country, including the capital. 

Yemen’s legitimate government requested support, and the Saudi-led coalition responded under Article 51 of the UN Charter.