System launched to help predict, plan for heavy rain in Saudi Arabia

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The system provides standard hour-by-hour weather predictions for next five days. (SPA)
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The system provides standard hour-by-hour weather predictions for next five days. (SPA)
Updated 18 October 2018
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System launched to help predict, plan for heavy rain in Saudi Arabia

  • "Matir" uses all the data to provide predictions and alerts for all of Saudi Arabia’s 286 secretariats and municipalities
  • Matir features a control panel that shows the overall forecast of flooding risk for the coming five days

JEDDAH: The Ministry of Municipal and Rural Affairs has launched a system to help predict and plan for heavy rain and flooding across the Kingdom
The high-tech system, called Matir, is the first of its kind in the Arab region. It is designed to help the authorities plan early for extreme weather situations, especially rain, and make the best decisions to minimize the loss of life and property.
To do this, it uses data from satellites and regional and international weather centers and monitoring stations. This raw data is modeled, with equations and algorithms applied to make forecasts with a high degree of accuracy.
Matir features a control panel that shows the overall forecast of flooding risk for the coming five days. The information is color coded based on the risk level, with yellow and red representing the highest risks.
The system also provides standard hour-by-hour weather predictions for next five days, including temperatures, wind speed and direction, rainfall intensity, mist and clouds, as well as relative humidity.
The system uses all the data to provide predictions and alerts for all of Saudi Arabia’s 286 secretariats and municipalities. It also provides radar data detailing the location and direction of thunderstorms and lightning.


Investigation into alleged mistakes in Yemen find coalition forces acted properly

Updated 17 January 2019
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Investigation into alleged mistakes in Yemen find coalition forces acted properly

JEDDAH: The Joint Incident Assessment Team in Yemen (JIAT) has investigated four allegations made by international governmental and non-governmental organizations and media about mistakes made by coalition forces while carrying out military operations inside Yemen.
JIAT spokesman Mansour Al-Mansour said that the team concluded that the procedures followed by the coalition forces were proper and safe, taking into consideration the rules of engagement, international humanitarian law and the coalition’s own rules.
Team members visited a number of cities in Yemen, including Aden, Lahj and Khor Maksar, during the investigation and spoke to witnesses, victims and their families to gather evidence and establish the facts.
In one of the incidents that was investigated, coalition warship fired on and destroyed a craft in the waters off the Yemeni port of Al-Khokha in September. Al-Mansour said that after examining documents and evidence JIAT had concluded that an alliance ship was escorting and protecting a flotilla of three Saudi merchant ships when, in an area off the port of Al-Khokha, a boat was spotted approaching the convoy at a high speed from the direction of the Yemeni coast.
The escort ship followed the accepted rules of engagement by repeatedly warning the unidentified vessel, using loudspeakers, not to come any closer. When these went unheeded, warning shots were fired but the boat continued to approach.
“On reaching an area that represented a threat to the convoy, the protection ship tackled the boat according to the rules of engagement and targeted it, resulting in an explosion on the boat,” said Al-Mansour. “The protection ship continued escorting the convoy. After the escort task was completed, the protection ship returned to the site of the targeted boat to carry out a search-and-rescue operation for the crew of the target boat but no one was found.”