Saudi Arabia to set up trial courts near women facilities

A Saudi woman has a driving lesson in Jeddah. (AFP)
Updated 18 July 2018

Saudi Arabia to set up trial courts near women facilities

  • The lifting of the ban on women driving marks a milestone for women in Saudi Arabia
  • Saudi women are on the roads and steering their way through busy city streets freely for the first time

JEDDAH: The Saudi Supreme Judicial Council has decided to set up trial offices for traffic violations and accidents next to facilities where women are detained. This initiative aims to expedite their trial in cases of accidents and traffic violations.
It falls under the myriad measures and initiatives adopted by the Ministry of Justice and the Supreme Judicial Council that aim to speedily examine various cases in general and women’s cases in particular, as well as to empower women in the judicial field.
The judicial measures and initiatives supporting women included granting the mother her right to be the guardian of a child under her custody.
This will make it easy for a woman to visit the Civil Status Bureau, Passports Department, embassies, education administrations and other pertinent authorities to prove that her family is eligible for social security.


Madinah museum showcases over 2,000 rare artifacts

Updated 23 August 2019

Madinah museum showcases over 2,000 rare artifacts

  • The museum has issued more than 44 books and publications on Madinah’s architecture

MADINAH: Dar Al-Madinah Museum offers visitors the opportunity to view historical pieces associated with the Prophet’s life. It features artifacts that capture the history, heritage, social life and culture of Madinah.

The museum’s executive director, Hassan Taher, said that it aims to promote the noble values of the Prophet Muhammad, encourage a sense of belonging and capture the history, culture and heritage of Madinah. The exhibits start with the Prophet’s life and end with the Saudi era.

Taher said: “The museum carries out specialized research in Madinah’s architectural heritage. It contains a library of relevant books, research and magazines, all of which are accessible to researchers.”

He said that the museum has issued more than 44 books and publications on Madinah’s architecture.

Taher explained that when preparing the museum’s narrative, it was necessary to reconcile temporal and spatial contexts so they created an added moral and intellectual value for the visitor.

He added: “There are around 2,000 artifacts in the museum’s exhibition halls. These include antiquities, extremely accurate models, handicrafts, manuscripts, documents, correspondence, old publications, postage stamps, photographs and artworks.”

One of the museum’s most valuable exhibits is a large collection of rare pieces associated with important moments in the Prophet’s life and the history of Madinah. 

These include various parts of the Kaaba, rare coins used in Madinah during different eras, ancient pottery, Islamic manuscripts, jewelry and collectibles from the pre-Islamic era.

Taher said that the museum has a professional team of guides who speak several languages, including English, Turkish, Urdu and Malay.