Saudi Arabia gets ready for labor courts early next year

Saudi Arabia’s Ministry of Justice said its plans for the soon-to-be-launched courts are all on track. (SPA)
Updated 24 July 2018
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Saudi Arabia gets ready for labor courts early next year

JEDDAH: The Kingdom is preparing for labor courts early in 2019.
The Ministry of Justice said its plans for the soon-to-be-launched courts are all on track. Judges are being trained, staff are getting proper induction and court buildings are being prepared and connected digitally.
Saudi Arabia has been working hard to push through initiatives that will organize the labor market and help it reach its highest potential, which will eventually boost investment in the Kingdom and drive the economy toward development and achievement of the Vision 2030 objectives.
According to the latest statistics revealed in Q1 2018; there are around 13 million workers in Saudi Arabia (10 million foreign and 3 million locals). These numbers are expected to increase with the ongoing mega projects across the Kingdom and the increasing demand for the labor force.
Labor court role will be a major drive toward creating ease and efficiency in conducting projects and ensuring those workers are working within a well-defined system that protects them.
“Labor courts will be connected to all government entities that deal with labor. We have already started studying labor dispute cases from the past few years and building our operational plan,” said the ministry.
”We are looking into achieving four objectives: Boosting investment opportunities, achieving excellence, swiftness of the labor judiciary, and benefiting from the rich databases of the courts.”


Saudi researchers join T20 summit in Japan

From left to right: Dr. Fahad Al-Turki, head of Saudi delegation; Kenichiro Sasae, president of The Japan Institute of International Affairs; Dr. Julia Pomares, co-chair of T20 Argentina during Argentine G-20 presidency; Kyoto Tsuji, vice-minister for Japanese foreign affairs; Naoyuki Yoshino, dean and CEO of the Asian Development Bank Institute; Gustavo Martinez, Argentine T20 executive director; Hiroshi Watanabe, president of the Institute for International Monetary Affairs pose during the event. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 54 min 35 sec ago
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Saudi researchers join T20 summit in Japan

  • Ways to fill economic infrastructure gaps, the US-China trade crisis analyzed

TOKYO: The world’s leading think tanks gathered for the G-20’s Think20 (T20) Japan Summit on Sunday in Tokyo, ahead of the upcoming G-20 Osaka Summit next month.
In the opening address, the president of the Japan Institute of International Affairs (JIIA), Kenichiro Sasae, spoke of the importance of technological advances, governance and multilateralism. 
“Technology is a tool,” he told assembled delegates. “We need two guiding symbols to harness modern technology to continue to pull economic growth. Technology has a wade-ranging impact, not only on business but also on privacy, protection.”
The T20 Summit comes amidst the backdrop of a four-day visit to the Japanese capital by US President Donald Trump.
Of the main topics discussed in closed sessions were finding innovative ways to fill economic infrastructure gaps, the US-China trade crisis, how to promote entrepreneurial ecosystems and climate change.
The host country has the privilege of selecting task forces specifically for the T20. Under the theme “Seeking a Sustainable, Inclusive and Resilient Society,” Japan’s T20 recommendations were based on theoretical and empirical analysis, and consist of 10 separate task forces.
They include sustainable development, climate change and environment, cooperation with Africa, Global governance and Future Politics.
Heading the Saudi T20 delegation, Dr. Fahad Al-Turki spoke to Arab News and told of the delegations’ various roles and expectations for the summit.
“We’re working with the Argentines, the Japanese and the Italians to ensure continuity on policy recommendations that will go to the G-20,” he said.
Five Saudi think tanks are being represented at the summit.
“The purpose is to have a collective effort from Saudi Arabia to represent the Kingdom at the T20. The first day went great, we talked with the authors of many of the policy briefs about our views and our recommendations,” he added.
Dr. Hossa Al-Mutairi told Arab News Saudi participation was essential, in anticipation to the 2020 G-20 Riyadh Summit.
“We participated last year as observers (at the 2018 summit in Buenos Aires), we went to learn from the Argentines, attended their sessions to understand the process of organizing T20 as well as how to select the task forces, but mainly to maintain a network with T20 members,” she said.
“One of the presentations that we had was on climate change, as Saudi Arabia cares about climate change, but we also care about economic stability. There is a connection between economics, environment and energy, you can’t separate them and we look into all energy sources.”