Saudi Arabia supplying fuel to help Basra as Iraq electricity protests continue

Iraqis protest at Tahrir square in Baghdad, Iraq July 27, 2018. (REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani)
Updated 28 July 2018
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Saudi Arabia supplying fuel to help Basra as Iraq electricity protests continue

  • Talks between Iraq and Saudi Arabia have led to “positive results” in collaborating in the fields of fuel and energy
  • Saudi Arabia will ship fuel to city of Basra to help Iraq through its electricity crisis and to keep its suspended power lines in operation

BASRA: Saudi Arabia will ship fuel to city of Basra to help Iraq through its electricity crisis and to keep its suspended power lines in operation, according to reports on Saudi Arabian state TV.
Al-Ekhabriya reports said Saudi Arabia is shipping the fuel to ease the electricity crisis in the country which has resulted in power shortages in parts of Iraq.
Talks between Iraq and Saudi Arabia have led to “positive results” in collaborating in the fields of fuel and energy.
The report said large amounts of fuel will be transported to Iraq from the port of Dammam in Saudi Arabia, and fuel will also be transported to the Al-Qasr port in Basra in the coming days.
Power cuts started last week across Iraq after Iran cut electricity and fuel supplies to the country over payment disputes.
Protests continue across the country as a result of the electricity crisis.


Tunisian police and protesters clash after death at police station

Policemen stand guard in Tunis. (AFP)
Updated 17 February 2019
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Tunisian police and protesters clash after death at police station

  • Tunisian activists say abuses by security forces have continued, albeit at a lower rate, since the 2011 revolution that overthrew the regime of President Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali

TUNIS: Police in Tunisia fired tear gas on Saturday to disperse demonstrators who protested after a young man died inside a police station near the coastal resort of Hammamet, witnesses said.
The young man was arrested on Friday after a fight between groups of youths in the town of Barraket Essahel, 60 km (37 miles) southeast of the capital Tunis, according to locals. While it was not immediately clear how he died, demonstrators blamed the security forces.
In a statement, the Interior Ministry said the young man had fainted after reaching the police station and died despite officers’ efforts to revive him. It said a judge had ordered an investigation.
Police in Barraket Essahel were not immediately available to comment.
Tunisian activists say abuses by security forces have continued, albeit at a lower rate, since the 2011 revolution that overthrew the regime of President Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali.