Palestinian protest icon Tamimi released from Israeli prison

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Palestinian teenager Ahed Tamimi and her mother Nareman walk out after they were released from an Israeli prison, at Nabi Saleh village in the occupied West Bank July 29, 2018. (Reuters/Mohamad Torokman)
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Palestinian teenager Ahed Tamimi is welcomed by relatives and supporters after she was released from an Israeli prison, at Nabi Saleh village in the occupied West Bank July 29, 2018. (Reuters/Mohamad Torokman)
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Palestinian activist and campaigner Ahed Tamimi (C) is seen upon he release from prison after an eight-month sentence for slapping two Israeli soldiers, in the West Bank village of Nabi Saleh on July 29, 2018. (AFP/Abbas Momani)
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Palestinian activist and campaigner Ahed Tamimi (C) embraces a woman upon her release from prison after an eight-month sentence for slapping two Israeli soldiers, in the West Bank village of Nabi Saleh on July 29, 2018. (AFP/Abbas Momani)
Updated 29 July 2018

Palestinian protest icon Tamimi released from Israeli prison

  • She was refused bail throughout her detention and subsequent trial in an Israeli military court
  • For Palestinians she is a hero, jailed for standing up to soldiers occupying her land

NABI SALEH, West Bank: Palestinian protest icon Ahed Tamimi returned home to a hero's welcome in her West Bank village on Sunday after Israel released the 17-year-old from prison at the end of her eight-month sentence for slapping and kicking Israeli soldiers.
Ahed and her mother, Nariman Tamimi, were greeted with banners, cheers and Palestinian flags as they entered the home village of Nabi Saleh.
Ahed was arrested in December after she slapped two Israeli soldiers outside her family home. Her mother filmed the incident and posted it on Facebook, where it went viral and, for many, instantly turned Ahed into a symbol of resistance to Israel's half-century-old military rule over the Palestinians. With her unruly mop of curly light-colored hair, the Palestinian teen quickly became an icon and an internationally recognizable figure.
In Israel, however, she is seen by many as either as a provocateur, an irritation or a threat to the military's deterrence policy.
In Nabi Saleh, supporters welcomed Tamimi home with Palestinian flags planted on the roof of her home. Hundreds of chairs were set up for well-wishers in the courtyard.
"The resistance continues until the occupation is removed," Ahed said upon her return. "All the female prisoners are steadfast. I salute everyone who supported me and my case."
From her home, Ahed headed to a visit to the grave of the late Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat.
Her father, Bassem Tamimi, said he expects her to take a lead in the struggle against Israeli occupation but she is also weighing college options.
In a sign of her popularity, a pair of Italian artists painted a large mural of her on Israel's West Bank separation barrier ahead of her release. Israeli police say they were caught in the act along with another Palestinian and arrested for vandalism.
Ahed was 16 when she was arrested and turned 17 in custody. Her case has trained a spotlight on the detention of Palestinian minors by Israel, a practice that has been criticized by international rights groups. Some 300 minors are currently being held, according to Palestinian figures.
Israel captured the West Bank, Gaza and east Jerusalem in the 1967 Mideast war. Palestinians are increasingly disillusioned about efforts to establish a state in those territories, after more than two decades of failed negotiations with Israel.

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Syria Kurds hand over four Daesh-linked children to Germany

Updated 50 min 9 sec ago

Syria Kurds hand over four Daesh-linked children to Germany

  • They included a boy and two sisters who had lost both parents, and a fatherless girl infant
  • A spokeswoman for the German foreign ministry confirmed the handover to staff from its consulate

SIMALKA CROSSING: The Kurdish authorities in northeast Syria on Monday handed over four children linked with the Daesh group to Germany, their first such repatriation to the European country, an official said.
“The autonomous region handed over four children from Daesh families to a delegation from Germany,” said Fanar Kaeet, a foreign affairs official with the Kurdish authorities.
They included a boy and two sisters who had lost both parents, and a fatherless girl infant who was repatriated for health reasons, Kurdish authorities said.
All are under 10 years old, they said.
A spokeswoman for the German foreign ministry confirmed the handover to staff from its consulate in neighboring Iraqi Kurdistan at the Simalka border crossing.
“I can confirm that four children who were in custody in northern Syria were able to leave Syria,” she said.
“The children were received on the Iraqi-Syrian border by staff of the consulate in Irbil and will be given to family members,” the spokeswoman said.
“From there, the children and their family members will, we believe, travel to Germany.”
Syria’s Kurds have spearheaded the US-backed fight against Daesh in Syria, and in March expelled the extremists from their last patch of territory in the war-torn country’s far east.
Even as they fight remaining sleeper cells, thousands of alleged Daesh fighters and family members are being held in their custody.
These include hundreds of suspected foreign fighters in their jails, and thousands of their alleged family members in overcrowded camps.
Western countries have been largely reluctant to repatriate their nationals.
But France and Belgium have brought a handful of orphans home, while the United States last year repatriated a woman with her four children.
Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and Kosovo have repatriated dozens of women and children.
Daesh overran large parts of Syria and Iraq in 2014, proclaiming a “caliphate” there, but offensives in both countries have seen them lose that territory.
A dozen children of alleged jihadist fighters have been repatriated from Iraq to Germany since March.