Shark kills Czech tourist swimming in waters off Egypt

A view of visitors at the beach at the Mediterranean city of Marsa Matrouh, northwest of Cairo, Egypt June 16, 2015. (Reuters)
Updated 05 August 2018
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Shark kills Czech tourist swimming in waters off Egypt

CAIRO: A Czech tourist was killed by a shark while swimming in the Red Sea off the coast of Egypt, authorities said Sunday.
The man died 20 kilometres north of Marsa Alam city as "a result of an attack by a shark", city council chairman General Atef Wagdy told AFP.
The health ministry is coordinating handing over the body to the Czech embassy, Wagdy said.
Local media reported on Friday that human remains were found on a beach in Marsa Alam.
The environment ministry has set up a committee to investigate the death and will issue a report, Wagdy added.
Marsa Alam attracts divers who explore coral and other marine life, including fish and sharks.
"There is no problem in diving" around Marsa Alam, but people who swim on the surface in deep waters beyond the coral can be vulnerable to attack, Wagdy said.
In 2015, a shark killed a German tourist off Egypt's Red Sea coast, marking the first death in five years.
There were six recorded shark attacks in Egyptian waters in 2010, including a spate of five in five days unusually close to the shore that killed another German and injured four other foreign tourists in December that year.
The 2010 attacks forced the government to close off a stretch of beach in the Sharm el-Sheikh resort for a week.
In 2017, Egypt received 8.3 million visitors, a surge of 54 percent from 5.4 million in 2016.
The country's tourism industry had been dealt a devastating blow in 2015 when militants bombed a Russian airliner carrying holidaymakers from Sharm el-Sheikh, killing all 224 on board.
Before that, the industry had begun to recover from the 2011 uprising that toppled president Hosni Mubarak.
Travel agencies, hotel managers and diving centres told AFP earlier this year that reservations have risen, especially in Red Sea destinations including Marsa Alam and Hurghada.


Terror funding has ‘new face,’ warns Saudi Arabia's attorney general

Updated 20 February 2019
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Terror funding has ‘new face,’ warns Saudi Arabia's attorney general

  • Financial crimes a rising threat to global economy, MENA forum told

JEDDAH: The changing dynamics of terror financing and money laundering posed a growing problem for countries and organizations seeking to halt their spread, a regional conference in Cairo was warned.

Saudi Arabia's Attorney General Sheikh Saud bin Abdullah Al-Mua’jab told the first Middle East and North Africa conference on countering terrorism that new forms of transnational terror funding and money laundering demanded greater cooperation between states and organizations.

The conference, organized by the Egyptian Public Prosecution Office, aims to bolster international unity in the face of the escalating threat of terrorist financing and money laundering operations.

“Saudi Arabia has spared no effort in combating these two crimes,” Al-Mua’jab said.

He said money laundering and terror financing are at the “forefront of global criminal phenomena,” and often complemented each other.

“One of the most important steps the world has taken through its international and regional systems is to engage in initiatives and agreements to combat terrorism financing and money laundering as the artery of the criminal body that strikes the global economy,” he said.

“Saudi Arabia is a key partner in the international coalition against the so-called Daesh terrorist organization and leads, together with the US and Italy, the Counter Daesh Finance Group. It has also implemented laws and procedures aimed at combating money laundering and terrorist financing,” he said.

Al-Mua’jab said the September 2018 report of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) on Saudi Arabia had praised the Kingdom’s commitment to the recommendations of the group.

“Saudi Arabia has spared no effort in combating these two crimes,” he said. “It was one of the first countries in the world to be affected by terrorist acts. Its experience of combating the crimes has been exemplary.”

He said measures taken by the Kingdom included the 2017 “Law of Combating Crime and its Financing,” regulation of charities and the establishment of a standing committee to investigate money laundering.

The Kingdom’s Public Prosecution Office recently released a manual outlining steps to counter money laundering, including measures for seizure and confiscation, tracking of funds and details of international cooperation. 

The Saudi Arabian Monetary Authority has also issued a guidebook for Saudi banks to combat money laundering. 

A recent Saudi Cabinet meeting outlined strategic objectives for reducing the risks of the two crimes, he said.