UAE to build oil pipeline between Eritrea and Ethiopia

Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi, Mohammed bin Zayed Al-Nahyan awarded the Zayed Medal to the Eritrean president and the Ethiopian prime minister. (File photo: WAM)
Updated 10 August 2018
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UAE to build oil pipeline between Eritrea and Ethiopia

ADDIS ABABA: The United Arab Emirates (UAE) will build a pipeline connecting Ethiopia to the Eritrean port of Assab, state media reported Friday.
The agreement was reportedly made during discussions in Addis Ababa between Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed and UAE Minister of International Cooperation Reem Al-Hashimy.
The state-affiliated Fana Broadcasting Corporate did not provide details on the agreement.
Landlocked Ethiopia used an oil refinery located in Assab port for its domestic oil needs before a two-year war over the demarcation of the border broke out between the two countries in 1998, leaving some 80,000 dead before settling into a bitter cold war.
In a surprise move in June, Ethiopia's new reformist Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed announced he would finally accept a 2002 United Nations-backed border demarcation, paving the way for peace between the two nations.
Reciprocal visits by the two nations' leaders led to the resumption of flights between their capitals as well as the opening of embassies and phone lines.
The UAE, which is reportedly using the Assab port to conduct military operations against Houthi rebels in Yemen, has been seen as a key mediator in the diplomatic thaw between Ethiopia and Eritrea.


Iran must stop supporting militias for peace offer to be taken seriously: Expert 

Updated 11 min 37 sec ago
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Iran must stop supporting militias for peace offer to be taken seriously: Expert 

  • Iran has for long pursued a policy of outsourcing its meddling to external militias
  • Among these are the Hezbollah in Lebanon and the Houthis in Yemen

JEDDAH: Iran needs to dismantle its proxies and end its interventions in Arab affairs before seeking to normalize relations with its Gulf neighbors, a political expert told Arab News on Sunday.

“The Gulf countries have been calling for normal relations with their neighbors for years, but their calls have fallen on deaf ears on the Iranian side,” Hamdan Al-Shehri, a political analyst and international relations scholar, said.

Accusing Tehran of “playing games,” Al-Shehri described Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif’s suggestion that Iran wanted to improve relations with its Gulf neighbors as worthless “as long as it continues meddling in the affairs of other countries, and fails to halt its evil militias from sabotaging and destabilizing regional security.”

Iran has for long pursued a policy of outsourcing its meddling to external militias, which indirectly supports, such as Hezbollah in Lebanon and the Houthis in Yemen. 

Zarif, who is on a two-day visit to Iraq, told a joint news conference in Baghdad with his Iraqi counterpart Mohammed Al-Hakim that Iran wants to build balanced relations with its Gulf Arab neighbors and had proposed signing a non-aggression pact with them.

However, Al-Shehri said that Tehran needs to address three key issues — its nuclear program; its terrorist militias, which have been spreading chaos in the Gulf region and beyond; and its ballistic missile program — before making any such proposals.

“The question is, would Iran be ready to give up all three files? If they want their neighbors to accept them and normalize relations with them, they have to be honest and stop playing games,” he said.

Al-Shehri described Zarif’s regional tour as an attempt to rally support and send a false message that Iran has friends and allies who would stand by them in their crisis with the US.

“Where were these countries when Iran’s terrorist proxies in Yemen, the Houthi militias, launched missiles and drones attacking the holiest Islamic site in Makkah and other Saudi facilities?” Al-Shehri asked.

Zarif said Iran will defend itself against any military or economic aggression, calling on European states to do more to preserve a nuclear agreement his country signed.

“We will defend (ourselves) against any war efforts, whether it be an economic war or a military one, and we will face these efforts with strength,” he said.

Strains have increased between Iran and the US following this month’s sabotage attack on oil tankers in the Gulf. Washington and other regional allies have concluded that Iran is most likely behind the attacks. 

Tehran has distanced itself from the bombings, but the US has sent an aircraft carrier and extra 1,500 troops to the Gulf, sparking concerns over the risk of conflict in the volatile region.