Iran unveils next generation missile

He described the new version of the Fateh Mobin as "100-percent domestically made... agile, stealth, tactical (and) precision-guided". (File photo: AFP)
Updated 13 August 2018
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Iran unveils next generation missile

  • Tehran's Fateh Mobin short-range ballistic missile were unveiled
  • Iran's missile programme is a major bone of contention with world powers, particularly the US

TEHRAN: Iran's defence minister unveiled the next generation of Tehran's Fateh Mobin short-range ballistic missile on Monday, according to conservative news agency Tasnim.
"As promised to our dear people, we will not spare any effort to increase the missile capabilities of the country and we will certainly increase our missile power every day," the minister, Brigadier General Amir Hatami, said.
He described the new version of the Fateh Mobin as "100-percent domestically made... agile, stealth, tactical (and) precision-guided".
"Be sure that the greater the pressures and psychological warfare against the great nation of Iran, our will to enhance our defence power in all fields will increase," he added.
Iran's missile programme is a major bone of contention with world powers, particularly the United States, but is seen as vital by Iran to its defensive posture in a troubled region.
President Donald Trump, who pulled out of the 2015 nuclear deal with Iran and world powers in May, has called for a new agreement that restricts Iran's missile capabilities and regional interventions.


Security tops agenda as Iraqi PM visits Egypt in first foreign trip

Updated 12 min 4 sec ago
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Security tops agenda as Iraqi PM visits Egypt in first foreign trip

  • After meeting Egyptian President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi, Abdul Mahdi highlighted “the importance of drying up the sources of terrorism”
  • The visit to Egypt is Abdul Mahdi’s first trip abroad since taking office in October

CAIRO: Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi sought Egypt’s support for efforts to tackle extremist militants in the region during a visit to Cairo on Saturday, his first trip abroad since taking office in October.
After meeting Egyptian President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi, Abdul Mahdi highlighted “the importance of drying up the sources of terrorism” and said “cooperation between Egypt and Iraq will be essential for this matter,” according to an official statement.
His comments came as US-backed forces said they had captured Daesh’s last shred of territory in eastern Syria at Baghouz, ending its territorial rule over a self-proclaimed caliphate straddling Syria and Iraq after years of fighting.
Though the defeat ends the group’s grip over the extremist quasi-state that it declared in 2014, it remains a threat.
Some Daesh fighters still hold out in Syria’s remote central desert and in Iraqi cities they have slipped into the shadows, staging sudden shootings or kidnappings and awaiting a chance to rise again.
The United States thinks the group’s leader, Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi, is in Iraq.
Defeating militants in Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula and restoring security after years of unrest has been a key promise of El-Sisi, the general-turned-president who came to power a year after the military overthrew Islamist President Mohammed Mursi in 2013.
Egypt has fought an insurgency waged by a Daesh affiliate in North Sinai since 2013. Hundreds of members of the security forces have been killed.