We take pride in our service, say female guides in Madinah

The number of female Hajj volunteers has risen dramatically this year. (SPA)
Updated 16 August 2018
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We take pride in our service, say female guides in Madinah

  • The female guide monitors all the data for the pilgrim and records them in the automated system
  • In the event of death, she reports it to officials in the health care office, who complete the necessary procedures

MAKKAH: Female guides in Madinah expressed pride in their work as part of the Kingdom’s care of pilgrims during their time in the country.

Riham Husni told Saudi Press Agency (SPA) about her first experience of serving visitors to Madinah, the city of the Prophet. 

“I hope to continue for the next few years and to make my family and the National Guides Establishment, which has given me the chance to do this noble job, proud.”

Majida Habash said she has worked in this field since 2005, and now, female guides offer more services as part of a comprehensive plan for female visitors. 

Majida said every female guide has a role to play in health care, including accompanying a female pilgrim when she goes into hospital and following up the case until she receives treatment, leaves the hospital or is transferred to another facility. 

The female guide monitors all the data for the pilgrim and records them in the automated system. In the event of death, she reports it to officials in the health care office, who complete the necessary procedures. Majida stressed the keenness of all involved to develop the role of the teams working in this field. “Our main duty is to serve the pilgrims and offer them a helping hand,” said Hala Samman. “The job is different from any other job, and I hope to work in the years to come and to serve the pilgrims better,” she said.

“The female guides follow their health conditions in the hospital. It is a great honor to do this humanitarian work every day and provide the necessary requirements to help pilgrims perform their pilgrimage.”

Hayat Hawalah said she works in the morning shift, and records patients’ data in the system. It is an honorable experience that she hopes she can do for years to come.

Wedian Fakhrani said the work is done in coordination with all the other female guides to provide the best services for pilgrims and visitors during the pilgrimage season. Abrar Mahmoud said she provides care for pilgrims at King Fahd Hospital in Madinah and follows up their cases until they leave the hospital.

Inas Al-Fal praised the efforts of all female staff during the pilgrimage season, while Samah Abdel-Hafiz said she conducts her work through statistically monitoring sick pilgrims in King Fahad Hospital.


‘Our History is Misk’ revive 20 traditional professional figures in Jeddah

Cafes were an important part of Jeddah’s social life. (AN photo)
Updated 24 September 2018
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‘Our History is Misk’ revive 20 traditional professional figures in Jeddah

  • Cafes were an important part of Jeddah’s social life

JEDDAH: “Our History is Misk,” supported by the Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman bin Abdul Aziz Foundation, is being organized at the historical site of Jeddah.
The event is bringing nostalgia through a number of scenes that embody the life the city witnessed decades ago.
It comes as one of the activities of the foundation’s initiatives center and is part of its role in encouraging creativity and promoting national values in society.
The activities include an open theater to portray the professions of Jeddah citizens in the past. A number of local actors brought 20 extinct professions back to life through their performances.
One of the actors sits in the center, playing the role of the mayor, who used to help the people and solved their differences. Also showcased were the “decorator,” who is similar to barbers nowadays, the distribution of fabrics used in houses at the time, the selling of water in alleys for nominal amounts of money, and the restoration and cleaning of shoes.
Cafes were an important part of Jeddah’s social life. In them, people with all kinds of professions met to drink tea and listen to a storyteller.