Morimoto: Ironclad flavor formula at celeb chef’s first UAE restaurant

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Morimoto — a new Japanese outlet from celebrity chef Masaharu Morimoto — stuns with its sheer size and scale. (Courtesy Morimoto)
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Morimoto — a new Japanese outlet from celebrity chef Masaharu Morimoto — stuns with its sheer size and scale. (Courtesy Morimoto)
Updated 16 August 2018
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Morimoto: Ironclad flavor formula at celeb chef’s first UAE restaurant

DUBAI: Dubai is no stranger to enormous glitzy restaurants, but even by the city’s larger-than-life standards, Morimoto — a new Japanese outlet from celebrity chef Masaharu Morimoto — stuns with its sheer size and scale. Spread across two floors of the Renaissance Downtown Hotel, the restaurant incorporates numerous spaces — from sushi bar and teppanyaki station to lounge areas, multiple private dining rooms and outdoor terraces boasting those ultimate Burj Khalifa views (ideal for the cooler months).
A giant paper lantern installation — a Morimoto signature — greets you at the entrance and dominates most of the space across the levels, but apart from the occasional Japanese accent the décor is all contemporary sophistication with a dash of edginess.
As a celebrity (“Iron”) chef, Morimoto has earned worldwide recognition for successfully adapting traditional Japanese flavors to international palates, and that is likely in part thanks to his respectful approach to the integrity of ingredients. This is evident here in the quality of produce that is used across the menu, most of it flown straight in from Japan — particularly for the sushi and teppan counters.
The ode to authenticity continues in the choice of kitchen staff too; the Japanese teppan head chef conjures up some culinary magic with his effortless flair — chopping, slicing and grilling some beautiful Hokkaido scallops, which he served me on a bed of greens with Japanese mayonnaise, and lightly seared Wagyu carpaccio, the provenance of which, down to the prefecture it comes from, he is happy to share. The results, served with some house-made wasabi, are delicious examples of how simplicity, when paired with quality, is really the secret recipe to great food.
You aren’t hemmed in when it comes to ordering either. Selections can be made from across all the different menus, wherever you are seated; for example, we tried some more-ish gyoza while sitting at the teppanyaki table. These, together with some grilled shisito peppers (basically Japanese padron peppers) speckled with ponzu sauce and Maldon sea salt, appropriately whetted our appetites.
Morimoto’s nod to Americanizing Japanese flavors is evident in dishes such as the Hamachi tacos and the tuna pizza, but he also draws inspiration from the various global locations he has restaurants in. His ‘angry chicken’ has become something of a signature dish — half a succulent roasted baby chicken, with the ‘anger’ coming from a spicy Indian-style garam masala marinade, a nod to his Mumbai venue. Paired with some roasted shisito peppers, this dish, while not strictly Japanese in nature, hits the spot when it comes to taste.
My litmus test for any contemporary Japanese concept is the miso black cod dish — everyone has a version, but few manage to nail it. While Morimoto’s version, served with a ginger soy reduction, may not be the best I’ve tried in Dubai, it is a respectable iteration, if a little on the too-sweet side. The butter-soft fish, willingly giving way to the slightest nudge of my fork, was excellent though, and it is a dish I’d happily order again.
While dessert selections range from s’mores to chocolate tarts, it’s the Asian-inspired mango parfait with coconut financier and green tea sorbet that caught my eye. It does provide a refreshing end to the meal, but I’m not sure all the flavors go together. Each element is good in and of itself, but there’s too much going on in one dish and together, they aren’t harmonious. I’d enjoy the mango and coconut concoction by itself, without the green tea overpowering it.
That’s a small blip on the radar for an otherwise great meal, made memorable not least by the smart, knowledgeable service. This, together with the varied menu, is what should ensure that the worryingly vast space will fill up, even if it is with returning punters working their way through the multitude of dishes.


Restaurants could be 1st to get genetically modified salmon

Updated 21 June 2019
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Restaurants could be 1st to get genetically modified salmon

  • The salmon produced by AquaBounty are the first genetically modified animals approved for human consumption in the US
  • They represent one way companies are pushing to transform the plants and animals we eat, even as consumer advocacy groups call for greater caution

NEW YORK: Inside an Indiana aquafarming complex, thousands of salmon eggs genetically modified to grow faster than normal are hatching into tiny fish. After growing to roughly 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) in indoor tanks, they could be served in restaurants by late next year.
The salmon produced by AquaBounty are the first genetically modified animals approved for human consumption in the US. They represent one way companies are pushing to transform the plants and animals we eat, even as consumer advocacy groups call for greater caution.
AquaBounty hasn’t sold any fish in the US yet, but it says its salmon may first turn up in places like restaurants or university cafeterias, which would decide whether to tell diners that the fish are genetically modified.
“It’s their customer, not ours,” said Sylvia Wulf, AquaBounty’s CEO.
To produce its fish, Aquabounty injected Atlantic salmon with DNA from other fish species that make them grow to full size in about 18 months, which could be about twice as fast as regular salmon. The company says that’s more efficient since less feed is required. The eggs were shipped to the US from the company’s Canadian location last month after clearing final regulatory hurdles.
As AquaBounty worked through years of government approvals, several grocers including Kroger and Whole Foods responded to a campaign by consumer groups with a vow to not sell the fish.
Already, most corn and soy in the US is genetically modified to be more resistant to pests and herbicides. But as genetically modified salmon make their way to dinner plates, the pace of change to the food supply could accelerate.
This month, President Donald Trump signed an executive order directing federal agencies to simplify regulations for genetically engineered plants and animals. The move comes as companies are turning to a newer gene-editing technology that makes it easier to tinker with plant and animal DNA.
That’s blurring the lines around what should be considered a genetically modified organism, and how such foods are perceived. In 2015, an Associated Press-GfK poll found two-thirds of Americans supported labeling of genetically modified ingredients on food packages. The following year, Congress directed regulators to establish national standards for disclosing the presence of bioengineered foods.
But foods made with the newer gene-editing technique wouldn’t necessarily be subject to the regulation, since companies say the resulting plants and animals could theoretically be produced with conventional breeding. And while AquaBounty’s salmon was produced with an older technique, it may not always be obvious when people are buying the fish either.
The disclosure regulation will start being implemented next year, but mandatory compliance doesn’t start until 2022. And under the rules , companies can provide the disclosures through codes people scan with their phones. The disclosure also would note that products have “bioengineered” ingredients, which advocacy groups say could be confusing.
“Nobody uses that term,” said Amy van Saun of the Center for Food Safety, who noted “genetically engineered” or “genetically modified” are more common.
The center is suing over the US Food and Drug Administration’s approval of AquaBounty’s salmon, and it is among the groups that asked grocers to pledge they wouldn’t sell the fish.
The disclosure rules also do not apply to restaurants and similar food service establishments. Greg Jaffe of the Center for Science in the Public Interest noted that AquaBounty’s fish will represent a tiny fraction of the US salmon supply, and that many people may not care whether they’re eating genetically modified food. Still, he said restaurants could make the information available to customers who ask about it.
“The information should not be hidden,” Jaffe said.
AquaBounty’s Wulf noted its salmon has already been sold in Canada, where disclosure is not required. She said the company believes in transparency but questioned why people would want to know whether the fish are genetically modified.
“It’s identical to Atlantic salmon, with the exception of one gene,” she said.