Egyptian pilgrim who lost loved ones in Al-Rawda attack praises King Salman’s invitation

Mustafa Hamdan Salama, 64, lost his loved ones during an attack on Al-Rawda mosque on 24 November. (SPA)
Updated 19 August 2018
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Egyptian pilgrim who lost loved ones in Al-Rawda attack praises King Salman’s invitation

MAKKAH: An Egyptian Hajj pilgrim has spoken about how being a guest of King Salman on pilgrimage has helped him cope with the pain of losing three of his sons and his brother in a terrorist attack last year.
Mustafa Hamdan Salama, 64, lost his loved ones during an attack on Al-Rawda mosque on 24 November in Egypt’s North Sinai province, an incident in which 305 people were killed — including 27 children — and 128 were injured.
The attack on worshipers at Al-Rawda mosque is the bloodiest in Egypt’s history.
Salama was invited as part of King Salman’s initiative for families of wounded personnel in the Egyptian army and police to perform the Hajj pilgrimage and Umrah each year.
When asked what the initiative meant to him, Salama said the invitation gave him “feelings of joy and pleasure” about King Salman’s offer to all Muslims and Egyptians in particular.
“It is not surprising from the leader of the Islamic nation, who stands with us at all times,” he added.


‘Our History is Misk’ revive 20 traditional professional figures in Jeddah

Cafes were an important part of Jeddah’s social life. (AN photo)
Updated 24 September 2018
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‘Our History is Misk’ revive 20 traditional professional figures in Jeddah

  • Cafes were an important part of Jeddah’s social life

JEDDAH: “Our History is Misk,” supported by the Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman bin Abdul Aziz Foundation, is being organized at the historical site of Jeddah.
The event is bringing nostalgia through a number of scenes that embody the life the city witnessed decades ago.
It comes as one of the activities of the foundation’s initiatives center and is part of its role in encouraging creativity and promoting national values in society.
The activities include an open theater to portray the professions of Jeddah citizens in the past. A number of local actors brought 20 extinct professions back to life through their performances.
One of the actors sits in the center, playing the role of the mayor, who used to help the people and solved their differences. Also showcased were the “decorator,” who is similar to barbers nowadays, the distribution of fabrics used in houses at the time, the selling of water in alleys for nominal amounts of money, and the restoration and cleaning of shoes.
Cafes were an important part of Jeddah’s social life. In them, people with all kinds of professions met to drink tea and listen to a storyteller.