Discovery of underground aqueducts from early Islamic era in ancient town of Fayd in Hail

A team of Saudi archaeologists have found traces of underwater aqueducts dating back to the early Islamic period in the ancient town of Fayd in Hail. (Google Earth screenshot)
Updated 19 August 2018
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Discovery of underground aqueducts from early Islamic era in ancient town of Fayd in Hail

ARAB NEWS JEDDAH: A team of Saudi archaeologists have found traces of underwater aqueducts dating back to the early Islamic period in the ancient town of Fayd in Hail.
Fayd is one of Saudi Arabia’s most ancient archaeological and historical cities, which lies east of the city of Hail, about 120 kilometers away, and is the third city of the old pilgrimage route after Kufa and Basra, and it is the largest station on the Iraqi pilgrimage route (Derb Zubaydah).
The team, which operates under the supervision of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH), discovered the fortress annexes outside the fort.
There were more discoveries, including a large number of architectural units, such as an ancient mosque which goes back to the early Islamic era and a number of architectural units that contained many rooms and architectural details that were buried between the exterior and interior walls of the fort.
Part of the interior wall of the fort was discovered in the south side as well as parts of the citadel in the southeastern side of the fort.
The plan of action included the discovery, preparation and cleaning of old wells located in what is known as the (Traditional Town) that is connected to underground aqueducts.


Houthi rocket targets desalination plant in Al-Shuqaiq

Updated 20 June 2019
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Houthi rocket targets desalination plant in Al-Shuqaiq

  • Saudi officials are working to identify the missile
  • The Houthi militants claimed the attack

DUBAI: A rocket fired by Houthi militia exploded near a desalination plant in Al-Shuqaiq southwest of Saudi Arabia, but did not cause any damage or injuries, state news agency SPA reported on Thursday.
Military and security organs were working to identify the type of rocket that was fired, Arab Coalition spokesperson Col. Turki Al-Maliki said in the report.
The Houthi militants claimed responsibility for the attack through their media channels.
The attack constitutes a war crime, as it targets civilian facilities, and shows that Iran is supplying new weaponry for the militants, Al-Maliki said, adding that the Houthis continue to use Hodeidah port to smuggle arms and endanger regional and international peace.
The Arab coalition would take immediate action to protect civilians against the Houthi attacks, Al-Maliki said.