Health Ministry tips for Hajj well-being

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The ministry advised asthma patients to consult a doctor. (AN photo by Bashir Saleh)
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Muslim pilgrims walk in a street in Saudi Arabia's holy city of Mecca on August 19, 2018, during the first day of the annual Hajj pilgrimage. (AFP)
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Muslim pilgrims use umbrellas to protect themselves from the sun as they walk in a street in Saudi Arabia's holy city of Makkah on August 19, 2018, during the first day of the annual Hajj pilgrimage. (AFP)
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An elderly Muslim pilgrim walks with her daughter to their bus as they leave for the annual Hajj pilgrimage in the Muslim holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018. (AP)
Updated 19 August 2018
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Health Ministry tips for Hajj well-being

  • Symptoms include shaking and giddiness, along with fatigue and exhaustion, a sudden feeling of hunger
  • The ministry advised asthma patients to consult a doctor, adhere to taking medicines

The Health Ministry is providing awareness-raising instructions and tips for Hajj on its official website.
These instructions cover chronic diseases, such as advising heart and hypertension patients to see a doctor to make sure they can perform Hajj and carry the right medicines, and ensure that the medicines are properly preserved and consumed, especially during Tawaf which requires great physical effort.
The ministry called on pilgrims potentially at risk of angina pain to consult a doctor about holding sublingual nitroglycerin tablets and using a wheelchair during Tawaf and Sai whenever pilgrims feel exhaustion.
The health instructions also covered diabetics, stressing the need to wear a bracelet or hold an identification card enabling rapid identification of patients with diabetes, have the prescribed medicine, and bring a glucose meter to determine the glucose dose daily.
The ministry highlighted the importance of keeping insulin cool by storing it in a proper ice pack or refrigerator and the need to be given a glucagon injection (when doctors recommend it) in case diabetics are not able to eat or have lost consciousness.
The ministry also advised against performing Tawaf and Sai until after taking medication and eating, stressing the need to stop performing the rituals temporarily in the event of a hypoglycemic episode. Symptoms include shaking and giddiness, along with fatigue and exhaustion, a sudden feeling of hunger, excessive sweating or blurred vision.
The ministry advised asthma patients to consult a doctor, adhere to taking medicines, tablets and inhalers, avoid crowded places, wear a face mask, and consult the nearest health center in case of an asthma attack.
The instructions also covered epileptic patients. Epileptic patients vary in their needs; some can control their illness with medicine and are able to perform Hajj, while patients recently diagnosed with epilepsy are advised to postpone Hajj. Epileptic patients are advised to inform the convoy’s doctor, bring enough medicines, avoid excessive exhaustion and reactions and always be accompanied by friends or relatives during Hajj.


Christchurch Muslims praise King Salman’s Hajj offer

Updated 2 min 57 sec ago
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Christchurch Muslims praise King Salman’s Hajj offer

  • The president of the Muslim Association of Canterbury Shagaf Khan said people will be both financially and spiritually supported during the journey
  • Khan said a trip to Makkah would normally cost around 10,000 New Zealand dollars ($6,769), but King Salman’s offer would cover pilgrims “from the time they leave their house and come back”

CHRISTCHURCH: King Salman’s Hajj offer to host families of those affected by March’s Christchurch terror attacks is “something really special,” said the president of the Muslim Association of Canterbury, Shagaf Khan.
The Saudi king has offered to host and cover the expenses of 200 Hajj pilgrims when they journey to Makkah this year.
Khan said people will be both financially and spiritually supported during the journey. “For some of them, it’ll be a great comfort feeling like they’ve fulfilled the obligations of being a Muslim,” he added.
Khan said a trip to Makkah would normally cost around 10,000 New Zealand dollars ($6,769), but King Salman’s offer would cover pilgrims “from the time they leave their house and come back.”
When asked what the offer would mean for Canterbury’s Muslim community, Khan said it is part of the solidarity and support that has been shown to them since the Christchurch terror attacks, which claimed the lives of 51 people.
“Four months on … people still feel supported and they feel they’re still being remembered,” he added.
Sheikh Mohammed Amir, who is working closely with the local community, Saudi Arabia’s Embassy and its Ministry of Islamic Affairs to implement King Salman’s offer, said it will be available for those who had lost family members or been injured in the mosque attacks.
Canterbury’s Muslims are “very appreciative” of the offer, added Amir, who is chairman of the Islamic Scholars Board of New Zealand.
“I’ll say with full confidence that this will be a big relief for the deceased’s families, for the victims, for all those who’ve been injured and affected,” he said.
When asked how the organization of the pilgrimage is going, Amir said “so far, so good,” but added that it has been challenging without official records to track everyone down.
He said it is an honor and a responsibility to help organize the pilgrimage, which he has been helping to plan since the end of Ramadan. “People are very excited about it,” he added.
He said he believed that the king’s offer had been made to help people’s rehabilitation after the terror attacks.
“The community believes he’s going to contribute in building Christchurch and bringing people to a normal life,” Amir added.