Health Ministry tips for Hajj well-being

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The ministry advised asthma patients to consult a doctor. (AN photo by Bashir Saleh)
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Muslim pilgrims walk in a street in Saudi Arabia's holy city of Mecca on August 19, 2018, during the first day of the annual Hajj pilgrimage. (AFP)
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Muslim pilgrims use umbrellas to protect themselves from the sun as they walk in a street in Saudi Arabia's holy city of Makkah on August 19, 2018, during the first day of the annual Hajj pilgrimage. (AFP)
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An elderly Muslim pilgrim walks with her daughter to their bus as they leave for the annual Hajj pilgrimage in the Muslim holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Sunday, Aug. 19, 2018. (AP)
Updated 19 August 2018
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Health Ministry tips for Hajj well-being

  • Symptoms include shaking and giddiness, along with fatigue and exhaustion, a sudden feeling of hunger
  • The ministry advised asthma patients to consult a doctor, adhere to taking medicines

The Health Ministry is providing awareness-raising instructions and tips for Hajj on its official website.
These instructions cover chronic diseases, such as advising heart and hypertension patients to see a doctor to make sure they can perform Hajj and carry the right medicines, and ensure that the medicines are properly preserved and consumed, especially during Tawaf which requires great physical effort.
The ministry called on pilgrims potentially at risk of angina pain to consult a doctor about holding sublingual nitroglycerin tablets and using a wheelchair during Tawaf and Sai whenever pilgrims feel exhaustion.
The health instructions also covered diabetics, stressing the need to wear a bracelet or hold an identification card enabling rapid identification of patients with diabetes, have the prescribed medicine, and bring a glucose meter to determine the glucose dose daily.
The ministry highlighted the importance of keeping insulin cool by storing it in a proper ice pack or refrigerator and the need to be given a glucagon injection (when doctors recommend it) in case diabetics are not able to eat or have lost consciousness.
The ministry also advised against performing Tawaf and Sai until after taking medication and eating, stressing the need to stop performing the rituals temporarily in the event of a hypoglycemic episode. Symptoms include shaking and giddiness, along with fatigue and exhaustion, a sudden feeling of hunger, excessive sweating or blurred vision.
The ministry advised asthma patients to consult a doctor, adhere to taking medicines, tablets and inhalers, avoid crowded places, wear a face mask, and consult the nearest health center in case of an asthma attack.
The instructions also covered epileptic patients. Epileptic patients vary in their needs; some can control their illness with medicine and are able to perform Hajj, while patients recently diagnosed with epilepsy are advised to postpone Hajj. Epileptic patients are advised to inform the convoy’s doctor, bring enough medicines, avoid excessive exhaustion and reactions and always be accompanied by friends or relatives during Hajj.


‘Our History is Misk’ revive 20 traditional professional figures in Jeddah

Cafes were an important part of Jeddah’s social life. (AN photo)
Updated 24 September 2018
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‘Our History is Misk’ revive 20 traditional professional figures in Jeddah

  • Cafes were an important part of Jeddah’s social life

JEDDAH: “Our History is Misk,” supported by the Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman bin Abdul Aziz Foundation, is being organized at the historical site of Jeddah.
The event is bringing nostalgia through a number of scenes that embody the life the city witnessed decades ago.
It comes as one of the activities of the foundation’s initiatives center and is part of its role in encouraging creativity and promoting national values in society.
The activities include an open theater to portray the professions of Jeddah citizens in the past. A number of local actors brought 20 extinct professions back to life through their performances.
One of the actors sits in the center, playing the role of the mayor, who used to help the people and solved their differences. Also showcased were the “decorator,” who is similar to barbers nowadays, the distribution of fabrics used in houses at the time, the selling of water in alleys for nominal amounts of money, and the restoration and cleaning of shoes.
Cafes were an important part of Jeddah’s social life. In them, people with all kinds of professions met to drink tea and listen to a storyteller.