Mina communicates with pilgrims in several languages

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Signs around the area help pilgrims. (Supplied)
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The organizers of the Hajj pilgrimage have ensured that the various languages spoken by Muslims are catered for. (Supplied)
Updated 21 August 2018
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Mina communicates with pilgrims in several languages

  • Not all Muslims speak Arabic, so it is essential to ensure there's signs in languages they understand
  • A team of translators has also been provided by the authorities

Mina welcomes pilgrims with signage in several languages — including Arabic, English, French, Urdu and Indonesian — on roadsides, above bridges and on camp gates.
Pilgrims from around the world flock to Mina every year to perform Hajj, and language differences can hinder communication.
Hence the use of signage in various languages to help pilgrims perform their rituals, find their lodgings and avoid wrong practices, among other things.
Dr. Abdul Fattah bin Suleiman Mashat, deputy minister of Hajj and Umrah, said the ministry has launched an awareness campaign in six languages — Arabic, English, French, Russian, Chinese and Persian — to educate pilgrims on Hajj regulations, provide them with health advice, and help them follow schedules in order to avoid overcrowding.
The ministry has launched the Manasikana smartphone app to provide pilgrims with services in eight languages, Mashat added.
The app informs pilgrims of grouping and transport plans, helps them find camps, lodgings and companions, and enables them to send reports and complaints to concerned authorities at the ministry.
The awareness campaign is part of the government’s efforts to provide high-quality services to enable the undertaking and completion of the pilgrimage safely and easily, Mashat said.


Tabuk military exhibition: Jump in, buckle up and take off

An aircraft cockpit fitted out with PlayStation DR technology will allow visitors to share the experience. (SPA)
Updated 16 February 2019
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Tabuk military exhibition: Jump in, buckle up and take off

  • The Royal Saudi Air Force is offering the activity as part of the third Armed Forces Exhibition for Diversification of Local Manufacturing, inaugurated on Thursday

JEDDAH: It is one of the most demanding skills in modern combat.
Now visitors to a military exhibition in Tabuk will get the chance to command a fighter plane and take part in a simulated air battle.
The Royal Saudi Air Force is offering the activity as part of the third Armed Forces Exhibition for Diversification of Local Manufacturing, inaugurated on Thursday.
An aircraft cockpit fitted out with PlayStation DR technology will allow visitors to share the experience of fighter pilots taking off and joining in supersonic aerial combat.