Mina communicates with pilgrims in several languages

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Signs around the area help pilgrims. (Supplied)
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The organizers of the Hajj pilgrimage have ensured that the various languages spoken by Muslims are catered for. (Supplied)
Updated 21 August 2018
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Mina communicates with pilgrims in several languages

  • Not all Muslims speak Arabic, so it is essential to ensure there's signs in languages they understand
  • A team of translators has also been provided by the authorities

Mina welcomes pilgrims with signage in several languages — including Arabic, English, French, Urdu and Indonesian — on roadsides, above bridges and on camp gates.
Pilgrims from around the world flock to Mina every year to perform Hajj, and language differences can hinder communication.
Hence the use of signage in various languages to help pilgrims perform their rituals, find their lodgings and avoid wrong practices, among other things.
Dr. Abdul Fattah bin Suleiman Mashat, deputy minister of Hajj and Umrah, said the ministry has launched an awareness campaign in six languages — Arabic, English, French, Russian, Chinese and Persian — to educate pilgrims on Hajj regulations, provide them with health advice, and help them follow schedules in order to avoid overcrowding.
The ministry has launched the Manasikana smartphone app to provide pilgrims with services in eight languages, Mashat added.
The app informs pilgrims of grouping and transport plans, helps them find camps, lodgings and companions, and enables them to send reports and complaints to concerned authorities at the ministry.
The awareness campaign is part of the government’s efforts to provide high-quality services to enable the undertaking and completion of the pilgrimage safely and easily, Mashat said.


Houthis agree to stop firing missiles at Saudi Arabia

Updated 19 November 2018
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Houthis agree to stop firing missiles at Saudi Arabia

  • The Iran-backed rebels ordered the cessation of rocket and drone attacks
  • It cessation was done at the request of UN special envoy Martin Griffiths

SANAA, Yemen: A senior leader of the Houthi militia says the group will halt rocket fire into Saudi Arabia for the sake of peace efforts.
The Houthi leader, Mohammed Ali Al-Houthi, says the Iran-backed rebels ordered the cessation of rocket and drone attacks on the Saudis and forces loyal to coalition member the United Arab Emirates at the request of UN special envoy Martin Griffiths.
The statement was carried by militia-controlled media early on Monday.
Griffiths announced on Friday that both sides had agreed to attend talks in Sweden “soon” aimed at ending the three-year war. The announcement followed an informal de-escalation last week around the key port city of Hodeidah.