Mina communicates with pilgrims in several languages

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Signs around the area help pilgrims. (Supplied)
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The organizers of the Hajj pilgrimage have ensured that the various languages spoken by Muslims are catered for. (Supplied)
Updated 21 August 2018
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Mina communicates with pilgrims in several languages

  • Not all Muslims speak Arabic, so it is essential to ensure there's signs in languages they understand
  • A team of translators has also been provided by the authorities

Mina welcomes pilgrims with signage in several languages — including Arabic, English, French, Urdu and Indonesian — on roadsides, above bridges and on camp gates.
Pilgrims from around the world flock to Mina every year to perform Hajj, and language differences can hinder communication.
Hence the use of signage in various languages to help pilgrims perform their rituals, find their lodgings and avoid wrong practices, among other things.
Dr. Abdul Fattah bin Suleiman Mashat, deputy minister of Hajj and Umrah, said the ministry has launched an awareness campaign in six languages — Arabic, English, French, Russian, Chinese and Persian — to educate pilgrims on Hajj regulations, provide them with health advice, and help them follow schedules in order to avoid overcrowding.
The ministry has launched the Manasikana smartphone app to provide pilgrims with services in eight languages, Mashat added.
The app informs pilgrims of grouping and transport plans, helps them find camps, lodgings and companions, and enables them to send reports and complaints to concerned authorities at the ministry.
The awareness campaign is part of the government’s efforts to provide high-quality services to enable the undertaking and completion of the pilgrimage safely and easily, Mashat said.


‘Our History is Misk’ revive 20 traditional professional figures in Jeddah

Cafes were an important part of Jeddah’s social life. (AN photo)
Updated 24 September 2018
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‘Our History is Misk’ revive 20 traditional professional figures in Jeddah

  • Cafes were an important part of Jeddah’s social life

JEDDAH: “Our History is Misk,” supported by the Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman bin Abdul Aziz Foundation, is being organized at the historical site of Jeddah.
The event is bringing nostalgia through a number of scenes that embody the life the city witnessed decades ago.
It comes as one of the activities of the foundation’s initiatives center and is part of its role in encouraging creativity and promoting national values in society.
The activities include an open theater to portray the professions of Jeddah citizens in the past. A number of local actors brought 20 extinct professions back to life through their performances.
One of the actors sits in the center, playing the role of the mayor, who used to help the people and solved their differences. Also showcased were the “decorator,” who is similar to barbers nowadays, the distribution of fabrics used in houses at the time, the selling of water in alleys for nominal amounts of money, and the restoration and cleaning of shoes.
Cafes were an important part of Jeddah’s social life. In them, people with all kinds of professions met to drink tea and listen to a storyteller.